Australia sets regulations for driverless vehicle systems

Road traffic authorities in Australia have received the regulations they must comply with to roll out intelligent transport systems (ITS)

ITS support driverless vehicles by enabling vehicle-to-vehicle, vehicle-to-person, and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications. Today’s regulations mark a key milestone towards mass rollout of driverless vehicles in Australia.

"ITS are expected to make roads smarter, safer, and cleaner through the use of communications technologies," says ACMA acting chair James Cameron. "The new Class Licence will facilitate the rollout of the latest transportation communications technology, putting Australia on par with other nations adopting ITS."

The 5.9GHz band has been made available for ITS usage in Australia as part of the Radiocommunications (Intelligent Transport Systems) Class Licence 2017 regulations.

An ITS station can be operated by a party with a Class License on the condition that it’s operated on a frequency, or within a range of frequencies, greater than 5855 MHz and not greater than 5925 MHz.

The power output must not exceed a maximum EIRP of 23 dBm/MHz and it cannot be operated within 70kms of the Murchison Radioastronomy Observatory. The station must also comply with ETSI Standard EN 302 571.

A key goal of the new regulations is to bring Australia in line with other major vehicle markets such as the United States and European Union. This regulatory alignment will aid with research and development, and the eventual rollout of driverless vehicles.

"Harmonising Australia's ITS arrangements with wider global developments means Australian motorists are more likely to enjoy the benefits of connected vehicles as they become available," ACMA said in a statement.

What are your thoughts on Australia’s new driverless vehicle regulations? Let us know in the comments.

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Build a six-wheeled RC vehicle for any terrain

In order to create the ultimate off-road RC rig, “asrebro” designed his own six-wheeled vehicle, operated with the help of Arduino.

To give it decent range and reliability, the hacker turned to a stock transmitter and receiver, but routed the PWM signals onboard to a Mega. The Arduino uses a pair of H-bridge boards to drive all six motors/wheels for tank-like movement.

Since an Arduino is used, this opens up a wide range of manual and automatic control options, and could even be used to power robotic accessories like a gripper or gimbal with a camera.

I decided to build a bigger robot that will easily overcome various obstacles on its way and will be able to move with a load of at least a dozen kilos. I also assumed that the robot should be able to cope in difficult terrain such as sand, snow and rubble. To make it possible, I built a 6-wheel [aluminum and duralumin] chassis equipped with 6 motors of sufficient high power and suitable motor driver and power supply. I also wanted my robot to be controlled from a long distance (at least 200 meters) so I used a good quality 2.4GHz transmitter and receiver.

You can see it in action below, traversing through a forest near Warsaw, Poland.

Arduino Blog

Sierra Wireless Launches Advanced Integrated Vehicle Telemetry and Connectivity Solution for Mission-Critical Fleets

Sierra Wireless Launches Advanced Integrated Vehicle Telemetry and Connectivity Solution for Mission-Critical Fleets

AirLink® MP70 LTE-A router with AirLink Mobility Manager now supports vehicle telemetry, inertial navigation and driver behavior reporting to improve fleet operations and vehicle maintenance.

Sierra Wireless today announced that its industry-leading AirLink® MP70 LTE-Advanced vehicle routers now support the most advanced, integrated vehicle telemetry, inertial navigation (dead reckoning), and driver behavior features to improve fleet operations and vehicle maintenance.

“Organizations can now monitor all their critical vehicle data and manage their entire fleet through a single pane of glass with our AirLink router and management systems,” said Jason Krause, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Solutions, Sierra Wireless.

“No other router solution in this class can deliver this level of vehicle awareness and connectivity to fleet and IT managers.”

The MP70 router is optimized for the world’s most demanding wireless applications, including public safety, field services and transit. The MP70 provides a high-performance vehicle networking solution to connect multiple high-bandwidth applications in and around the vehicle, while also providing IT departments with the flexibility to manage mobile assets in the cloud or in the enterprise data center using Sierra Wireless AirLink Network Management solutions.

“We’re testing this capability now, and it is going to give our fleet manager all of the information he needs to proactively support our vehicles,” said Jay Cooper, Director Ancillary Services, Mobile Medical Response. “With Sierra Wireless’ AirLink solution, I don’t have to invest an extra $ 200 – $ 400 per vehicle in separate systems to provide vehicle telemetry, inertial navigation and driver behavior reporting. It’s all supported on the router, and the data is instantly accessible in the management system.”

With the upcoming software release (ALEOS 4.9.0), the MP70 will support an integrated vehicle bus interface using a direct cable connection (OBD-II and J1939), so customers no longer need to buy external dongles or scanners to monitor vehicle health. The new release also enables built-in sensors (accelerometer and gyroscope) for inertial navigation to provide precise geo-location capabilities, even in urban canyons and underground garages where satellites can’t be seen. The built-in sensors also provide the ability to monitor driver behavior, including harsh acceleration and braking.

The MP70 seamlessly integrates out of the box with the AirLink Mobility Manager (AMM)—an end-to-end network management solution that enables instant network insight and control for centralized and remote management, monitoring and configuration. AMM is available as a cloud service or as an on-premise solution. With the release of AMM 2.16 on Sept. 15, 2017, AMM now integrates telemetry features across the AirLink in-vehicle product line.

Sierra Wireless MP70 Telemetry Solution

Availability

The AirLink MP70 with support for vehicle telemetry, inertial navigation and driver behavior features is commercially available through Sierra Wireless’ authorized channel partners worldwide. The ALEOS 4.9.0 release will be available at the end of September 2017.

The post Sierra Wireless Launches Advanced Integrated Vehicle Telemetry and Connectivity Solution for Mission-Critical Fleets appeared first on IoT Business News.

IoT Business News

Should Uncle Sam be worried about autonomous vehicle job losses right now?

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Highly automated vehicles will positively benefit society in a myriad of ways, but there is also a concern that these vehicles will cause job displacement. We recently sat down with Elliot Katz, chair of McGuireWoods’ Connected and Automated Vehicle practice, to talk about highly automated vehicle deployment and concerns surrounding job displacement, and what the government should be doing now to address this potential issue.

ReadWrite: I have heard that, despite the many benefits that highly automated vehicles will bring to society, many people are concerned about the potential impact these vehicles may have on our workforce. Any thoughts?

Elliot Katz: Highly automated vehicles (HAVs) will benefit society by reducing traffic fatalities, decreasing congestion, reducing air pollution, opening up travel time to productivity and family enjoyment, providing true mobility for all, and creating new jobs. However, you are correct that the introduction of HAVs has raised job displacement concerns, both from labor unions and our government. For example, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao has said she is “very concerned” about the impact of HAVs on U.S. jobs.

RW: Do you believe these concerns are warranted?

EK: I believe that the transition to driverless vehicles and other technological advances will create new employment opportunities, and that with the right policy and institutional responses from our government, HAV deployment will lead to enhanced levels of employment.

The issue is not that HAV deployment will render individuals whose jobs may be displaced unemployable. Instead, it is that those individuals – without proper occupational training – may lack the skills necessary to successfully transition into the high-quality jobs created by HAV deployment.

RW: Has our government taken any actions to proactively address potential job displacement in our driverless future?

EK: Not directly, no. One thing the government has done – which is highly problematic – is limit the amount or type of HAVs that can be deployed, due to the fear that HAV deployment will cause unemployment. For example, the House included a 10,000-pound weight limit in the Self Drive Act, so that highly automated semi-trucks could not be deployed the way passenger vehicles could be under the bill.

RW: Why is that type of government action highly problematic?

EK: Because we need all types of HAVs deployed to curb traffic accident fatalities, which are on the rise. Last year, an estimated 40,000 traffic accident fatalities occurred in the U.S., and because NHTSA estimates that HAVs could prevent 19 out of every 20 traffic accidents, we cannot afford to limit the amount or type of HAVs deployed on our roads.

By limiting the type or amount of HAVs deployed due to potential unemployment concerns – an issue that can be ameliorated with proper governmental response and action – the government is tempering the life-saving benefits of HAV deployment, while not addressing potential job displacement. According to the Department of Commerce, over 15 million U.S. workers are employed in occupations that could be affected by HAV deployment. That’s why potential job displacement is a critical issue that must be addressed now. By simply limiting HAV deployment in the near term, the government is not addressing the core underlying issue of job displacement that may result from the inexorable and ubiquitous advancement of HAV technology. At some point, humans will no longer drive vehicles, and our government needs to prepare for that time now.

See also: How autonomous vehicles could lead to more jobs in Detroit

RW: What actions do you believe the government should take to proactively deal with this potential issue?

EK: I believe the government should implement occupational training programs to ensure that people have the skills needed to transition to the jobs borne out of HAV deployment.

RW: Do you believe that is possible?

EK: Very much so. In line with his economic agenda, President Trump signed an executive order in June to support the flexibility and growth of workforce development programs and apprenticeships across the country through increased federal funding, new industry-led apprenticeship program guidelines, and a task force responsible for promoting apprenticeship programs. The transition to driverless vehicles will create new employment opportunities, and President Trump’s executive order provides a perfect opportunity to create and implement the training programs needed to ensure that HAV deployment leads to enhanced levels of employment.

RW: Why do you believe that it is important for the government to act now?

EK: President Trump has routinely criticized companies for purportedly shipping jobs overseas, and if nothing is done to retrain U.S. workers, it may only be a matter of time before he turns his attention to potential job displacement in a driverless future. HAVs will have such a net positive impact on society that we cannot risk having government inaction jeopardize the deployment of these vehicles.

Just a few weeks ago, India’s transport and highways minister stated that driverless cars would not be allowed in India, precisely because he believes the technology will take away jobs and lead to unemployment. I strongly believe that is the wrong approach for all the reasons I stated earlier – especially given that, tragically, there were nearly 150,000 traffic accident fatalities in India in 2015 – and I do not want to see the U.S. similarly limit the deployment of these life-saving vehicles.

Elliot Katz is the chair of McGuireWoods’ Connected and Automated Vehicle practice. In that role, Elliot counsels automakers, global tech companies, ridesharing companies, and municipalities on legal and policy issues pertaining to these types of vehicles, and the greater mobility ecosystem. An advocate who recognizes the important societal and economic benefit of highly automated vehicles, Elliot regularly speaks at connected and automated vehicle events across the U.S. and throughout the world.

The post Should Uncle Sam be worried about autonomous vehicle job losses right now? appeared first on ReadWrite.

ReadWrite