RoboGlove assists users with gripping objects

The RoboGlove project is a robotic glove by students at the Université Libre de Bruxelles that is designed to assist the wearer when continuously gripping objects.

This is accomplished by a series of three servos that transmit force through cables for the index finger, middle finger, and thumb. Control is via an Arduino Uno, which takes input from pressure sensors in the three finger fixtures, helping the wearer keep gripping when force is initially exerted to close a fist.

The glove has a wire connection that links the fingers to some servo motors: a wire is attached to the extremity of the finger and to the servo, so when the servo turns, the wire is pulled and the finger is flexed. In this way, by controlling the grip done by the user through some pressure sensors in the extremity of the fingers, we are able to actuate the motors in a controlled way and help the gripping by bending the finger proportionally to the rotation of the motors and so to the rolling up of the wires. In this way we should be able either to allow weak people to grip objects or help even people in physiological conditions to grip objects and to keep it without any effort.

While still a prototype, it’s an interesting device that could be developed further into a very helpful augmentation. You can see it in action below!

Arduino Blog

How AT&T migrated 40,000 users to IBM’s IoT solutions

Any telecom provider must always try to avoid network downtime. But to stay competitive these companies also must constantly upgrade their software and systems. So when AT&T decided to migrate more than 40,000 users to comprehensive IBM IoT solutions—to support internal software development and replace its existing disparate solutions—the company knew it was facing a long slog.

Naturally, service outages were not an option during this protracted transition. That’s a primary reason why, over the course of about three years, the company used an agile business planning model and IoT-enabled solutions from IBM to complete this monumental project. AT&T agile tool product owner and team lead Tiina Seppalainen detailed how it all unfolded at the recent IBM Continuous Engineering Summit in New Orleans.

Seppalainen CE Summit re IoT solutions

AT&T’s Tiina Seppalainen describes her company’s use of IBM’s IoT solutions.

Deliberate and sequential planning

Seppalainen said the keys to success lied in broad buy-in from all levels of the company. This included a meticulously planned process for executing and managing the changes at various stages. “We had an aggressive and changing schedule, and we did this without any kind of formal training; we were given the tools and told to have at it, so that’s what we did,” she explained, adding that the project involved about 3,000 applications, about 100 project areas and 57 servers.

Careful and sequential planning were key.  Seppalainen and her colleagues set up about 10 scrum teams, a total of about 100 people, who were primarily dedicated to the project. “This allowed us to be nimble and change as needed, which was frequently,” Seppalainen recalled. “We regularly adjusted either what we were doing or when we were doing it. And we had a team to engage user groups and keep people apprised of the progress.” She said the company’s leaders actively supported the endeavor via internal communications, webcasts and town halls so “it would be very clear from the top down that this was going to happen, and quickly, and everybody needed to support it.”

In keeping with the agile model, the migration teams rolled out the new solutions in phases. They received feedback from early adopters and adjusted accordingly. Of course, large organizations like AT&T have many stakeholder groups with different wants and needs for their respective operations. Seppalainen reported that while they couldn’t fulfill everyone’s wish list, they were able to prioritize and deliver the most critical requests.

Coordinating the calendar

The volume of users necessitated scheduled releases and automated updates. The agile team spread these across the calendar to avoid overwhelming everyone with the changes. (Seppalainen applauded IBM’s crucial assistance in the project area design work, calling it “a key to our success.”) “We had a lot of concurrent and dependent activities and multiple work streams, and they all had to be managed,” she added. “It was a major challenge to coordinate interdependent and overlapping work efforts.”

This meant having frequent meetings, almost all of them virtual, including check-ins at the beginning and end of every work day. “It was a very agile mindset,” Seppalainen said. “That’s what made this happen; just doing that day in day out.”

Testing and training of IoT solutions

Once new roll-outs were in place, AT&T conducted extensive testing. It established training courses that included certifications, and created “small-bite” videos so users could quickly refresh their skills as needed.

Now that the heavy lifting has concluded, Seppalainen contends that her company views this massive endeavor as a success. “Using the agile approach was one of the key factors because it’s team oriented, very iterative and gives you the ability to adjust to changing needs,” she explained. “Our strong program and project management is what brought this three-year odyssey to fruition.”

To see how you can streamline operations and improve productivity for organizations of all sizes with IBMs Continous Engineering and IoT solutions, visit our landing page. And join us at Think 2018, March 19-22 in Las Vegas.

The post How AT&T migrated 40,000 users to IBM’s IoT solutions appeared first on Internet of Things blog.

Internet of Things blog

How AT&T migrated more than 40,000 users to IBM’s IoT connected products

For any telecom provider, avoiding system downtime is usually job one. So when AT&T decided to migrate more than 40,000 users to IBM’s IoT-enabled connected products—with the goal of supporting internal software development and replace its existing disparate solutions—the company knew it was in for a long slog.

Over the course of about three years, the company used an agile business planning model to pull off this monumental project. AT&T agile tool product owner and team lead Tiina Seppalainen detailed how it all unfolded at the recent IBM Continuous Engineering Summit in New Orleans.

Seppalainen CE Summit

AT&T’s Tiina Seppalainen describes her company’s Rational migration at the 2017 CE Summit.

Connected products buy-in and planning

Seppalainen said the keys to success lied in broad buy-in from all levels of the company and a meticulously planned process for executing and managing the changes at various stages. We had an aggressive and changing schedule, and we did this without any kind of formal training,” she said. “We were given the tools and told to have at it, so that’s what we did.”AT&T had to account for about 3,000 applications that support different parts of the company. “We ended up [affecting] about 100 project areas and 57 servers. And they all needed to be built in time for the migrations to the Rational tools,” Seppalainen said. “It was all planned very carefully and sequentially because of the dependencies between our servers.”

This included setting up between five and 10 scrum teams with a total of about 100 people who were primarily dedicated to the project. “This allowed us to be nimble and change as needed, which was frequently,” Seppalainen said. “We regularly adjusted either what we were doing or when we were doing it, and we had a team to engage user groups and keep people apprised of the progress.”

She added that a critical component of the endeavor was strong leadership commitment at multiple levels and very active support. This included internal communications, webcasts and town halls. “It was very clear from the top down that this was going to happen, and quickly, and everybody needed to support it,” Seppalainen said.

In keeping with the agile model, the migration teams rolled out the new solutions in phases, received feedback from early adopters provided input, and adjusted accordingly. Naturally, such a large organization has many stakeholder groups that wanted different things. Seppalainen said they couldn’t fulfill everyone’s wish list, but they were able to prioritize the most critical requests.

Coordinating the calendar

The volume of users necessitated scheduled releases and automations, which the agile team spread out across the calendar so as not to overwhelm everyone with the build-outs and iterations. (Seppalainen said the crucial help IBM provided in the project area design work was “a key to our success.”) “We had a lot of concurrent and dependent activities and multiple work streams, and they all had to be managed,” she said. “It was a major challenge to coordinate interdependent and overlapping work efforts.”

This meant having frequent meetings, almost all of them virtual, including check-ins at the beginning and end of every work day. “It was a very agile mindset,” Seppalainen said. “That’s what made this happen; just doing that day in day out.”

Testing and training

Once new roll-outs were in place, AT&T conducted extensive testing, established training courses that included certifications, and created “small-bite” videos so users could quickly refresh their skills as needed.

Now that the heavy lifting has concluded, Seppalainen said her company views this massive endeavor as a success. “Using the agile approach was one of the key factors because it’s team oriented, very iterative and gives you the ability to adjust to changing needs,” she said. “Our strong program and project management is what brought this three-year odyssey to fruition.”

To see how you can streamline your organization’s operations and improve productivity with IBMs Continous Engineering and IoT solutions, visit our landing page. And join us at Think 2018, March 19-22 in Las Vegas.

The post How AT&T migrated more than 40,000 users to IBM’s IoT connected products appeared first on Internet of Things blog.

Internet of Things blog

Arduino IDE 1.8.5: Hotfix for macOS High Sierra Users

In case you haven’t noticed, our team has just released Arduino IDE 1.8.5This time the changelog is fairly small, as it mainly solves a (rather important) problem being encountered by macOS users who just updated to High Sierra (10.13).

If you are not using English as system language, any version of Arduino you launch will lack the menu in the system bar. Every Java application is experiencing the same problem, so it will probably be solved by Apple in the near future.

In the meantime, IDE 1.8.5 recognizes when the menu bar is not being displayed and replaces it with a Windows-style one. It may not be the prettiest thing, but at least it works!

If you want to recover the old menu bar while keeping the whole system in your normal language, you can issue a single command on Terminal:

defaults write cc.arduino.Arduino AppleLanguages '(en)'

 

Thank @AdrianBuza for the workaround. Issuing this command will make Arduino IDE in English, however you can still change the language under “Preferences” without losing the macOS integration.

Arduino Blog

Google’s New AR SDK For Android Users

Google’s New AR SDK For Android Users

Spreading Augmented reality to the Android masses, Google has launched its AR SDK which allows developers build augmented reality apps on Android. Rugged IIoT radios from Freewave are a life-saver by enabling critical weather, atmospheric and climate research in the world’s worst weather. Finally, Vicor’s new MCMs (modular current multipliers) meet the increasing demands of high performance applications such as artificial intelligence (AI) & machine learning.


Google’s New SDK Makes AR Popular On Android Smartphones 

Google is spreading AR to the Android Masses with its new software development kit (SDK) called ARCore. The software brings augmented reality capabilities to 100 million existing and most future Android phones, starting with the Samsung Galaxy S8 and Google’s own Pixel phone. Developers can start experimenting with features like Motion tracking, environmental understanding, and light estimation. The software doesn’t require any special hardware. Read more.

 


Rugged IIoT Save Lives In The World’s Worst Weather

FreeWave’s rugged 900 MHz radios are able to withstand the extreme and harsh weather conditions at the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, which is focused on critical weather, atmospheric and climate research. At MWO, FreeWave’s FGR and FGR2 radios connect a network of 28 sensors and devices on five remote weather stations and deliver data in spite of the area’s year-round harsh weather. MWO provides vital data for local government agencies to assess active conditions in order to protect the lives of crews during search and rescue operations. According to FreeWave, its low-power solutions are ideal to enable 24-hour, year-round network connectivity for the weather stations which are solar-powered and only receive sunlight 40% of the year. Read more.


High-current AI Processors Get A Big Boost

Two initial Power-on-Package MCM (modular current multipliers) devices are being introduced by Vicor. The small (32mm x 8mm x 2.75mm) package and low noise characteristics of the MCMs make them suitable for co-packaging with noise-sensitive, high performance XPU’s (ASICs, GPUs and CPUs). The MCMs overcome the challenge of these XPUs’ operating currents now being measured in hundreds of Amperes, due to the increasing demands of high performance applications such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and big data mining. Read more.


 

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