IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

Number of connected IoT devices to top 31 billion in 2018.

Driven by the need for intelligent connected devices in industrial and commercial applications, the number of connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices globally will grow to more than 31 billion in 2018, according to new analysis from business information provider IHS Markit.

The commercial and industrial sector, powered by building automation, industrial automation and lighting, is forecast to account for about half of all new connected devices between 2018 and 2030.

Jenalea Howell, research director for IoT connectivity and smart cities at IHS Markit, said:

“The IoT is not a recent phenomenon, but what is new is it’s now working hand in hand with other transformative technologies like artificial intelligence and the cloud. This is fueling the convergence of verticals such as industrial IoT, smart cities and buildings, and the connected home, and it’s increasing competitiveness.”

In its latest IoT Trend Watch report, IHS Markit identifies four key drivers and the trends that will impact the IoT this year and beyond:

Innovation and competitiveness

  • The IoT opportunity has attracted numerous duplicative and overlapping wireless solutions such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 5G, NB-IoT, LoRa and Sigfox. Standards consolidation lies ahead, but confusion and fragmentation will dominate in the near term.
  • Enterprises are leveraging the location of data as a competitive advantage — and as a result, a hybrid approach to cloud and data center management is taking hold. More and more companies will employ both on-premises data centers and off-premises cloud services to manage their IT infrastructure.

Business models

  • 5G builds upon earlier investments in M2M (machine-to-machine) and traditional IoT applications, enabling significant increases in economies of scale that drive adoption and utilization across all sectors of industry. Improved low-power requirements, the ability to operate on licensed and unlicensed spectrum, and better coverage will drive significantly lower costs across the IoT.
  • Cellular IoT gateways, which facilitate WAN connectivity, will be integral to edge computing deployments. 2018 will bring increased focus on compute capabilities and enhanced security for cellular IoT gateways.

Standardization and security

  • Cybersecurity is a leading concern for IoT adopters. IoT deployments face critical cybersecurity risks because there are potentially many more IoT devices to secure compared to traditional IT infrastructure devices, presenting increased risk to traditional communications and computing systems, as well as physical health and safety.
  • Despite the promise it holds, blockchain — a technology for securely storing and transferring data — is not a panacea. Initially, IoT applications for blockchain technology will focus on asset tracking and management.

Wireless technology innovation

  • IoT platforms are becoming more integrated. Currently, there are more than 400 IoT platform providers. Many vendors are using integration to compete more effectively, providing highly integrated functionality for IoT application developers and adopters.
  • Significant innovation will occur when IoT app developers can leverage data from myriad deployed sensors, machines and data stores. A key inflection point for the IoT will be the gradual shift from the current “Intranets of Things” deployment model to one where data can be exposed, discovered, entitled and shared with third-party IoT application developers.

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Smart Building Technology Trends for 2018

In 2018, smart building technologies that increase energy efficiency will continue to be at the top of the list for building managers and tenants. These technologies can generate a solid ROI by lowering utility bills, making the investment easier to justify.

In addition to energy management, there is growing demand for solutions to address new government initiatives, and integrated security and safety systems. These requirements will help the global Internet of Things (IoT) for intelligent buildings market to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 15.0 percent, from $ 6.3 billion (USD) in 2017 to $ 22.2 billion in 2026, according to a Navigant Research forecast.

Once this infrastructure is in place, what else can you do with it? Improving asset management and increasing occupant comfort can often piggyback on the investments made to curb energy usage. Intel, along with our partners, see the industry finding synergistic ways to use smart building technology. Here are some technology trends we’re following in 2018:

 

A picture of an energy efficient smart building.

 

1. The next wave of energy efficiency is coming

Early investments in smart building technology focused on the low hanging fruit, like upgrading HVAC units and transitioning from incandescent and fluorescent bulbs to LED lighting. Now, organizations are going to the next level with room-by-room lighting control, dynamic temperature control, pre-heated/pre-cooled buildings based on traffic, and other fine-tuning measures. Energy management solutions will incorporate more sensing technology and integrate multiple data sources to improve decision making. With the transition to LED lighting, organizations are going further than bulb replacement, adding building intelligence via sensors mounted in lighting fixtures. The sensors can connect to a gateway or network via a low-rate wireless personal area network (e.g., 802.15.4) or power over Ethernet (PoE). One building at a time, Intel is retrofitting lighting fixtures to sense ambient light and room occupancy and ultimately conserve more energy.

 

2. OT/IT convergence reduces operations costs

Many smart building solutions are looking more like IT systems, incorporating information technology (IT), like wireless networks and standard communications protocols. This transition is driving convergence of IT and operational technology (OT). Convergence enables these groups to lower operations costs by eliminating redundancy through collaboration on security, networking, and storage infrastructure; customer support; data analysis and reporting; etc.

 

3. Improved asset management increases ROI

Cameras that count people in buildings can also be used to help maximize the utilization of assets, like work cubicles. This is done at Intel, where camera data is sent to a conference scheduling application that can tell employees which cubicles are unassigned and available for use. Smart building technology is also being used to reduce operations costs and increase building performance through predictive maintenance. Sensor data is analyzed in the cloud by machine learning algorithms that determine the health of a piece of equipment, like a pump, compressor, or HVAC. The algorithms can differentiate normal wear from problematic behavior for individual pieces of equipment. Predictive maintenance solutions empower companies to make quicker, more informed decisions with help from big data analytics and alerts.

 

4. Cost-effective BMS solutions for small to medium-sized buildings

Technology advancement, like the Internet of Things (IoT) and low-cost sensors, is bending down the cost curve for building management systems (BMS). We are at the point where smart building technology can be affordably installed and managed in small to medium-sized buildings. Prescriptive Data offers such a solution, called NANTUM, a cloud-based, secure building operating system that integrates into any built space, including BMS and non-BMS facilities. The solution helps optimize energy consumption and increase tenant comfort, while providing cost savings. NANTUM learns the rhythm of existing building systems, memorizing today’s operations so that it can positively influence, predict, and prescribe tomorrow’s performance.

 

5. Occupants get more control over their environment

Temperature variation throughout the day is a common complaint of building occupants and, most likely, impacts their productivity. A study shows a socially-driven HVAC at the Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Phoenix increased worker satisfaction with workplace thermal comfort by 83 percent, which should translate into higher productivity and fewer tickets the facilities team needs to address related to occupants being too hot or too cold.

To maintain a constant temperature across various building zones, Intel implemented a machine learning algorithm that predicts appropriate set points for the HVAC in the building. The algorithm not only factors in typical parameters (e.g., return air temperature), it takes into account many others, including occupancy, and ambient temperature. This algorithm runs every two minutes to keep set point predictions current.

 

6. Buildings become energy assets in their community

Cities and grids are starting to view connected buildings with energy-generation capabilities (i.e., rooftop solar panels) as energy assets. These highly energy-efficient, net zero energy buildings are seen as contributing to society by producing as much energy as they consume.

In my next blog, I will discuss how new technologies, such as IoT and deep learning, can be designed and deployed to better address these building trends.

To learn about Intel energy solutions visit intel.com/energy. To stay informed about Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook and Twitter.

 


IoT@Intel

Energy Industry Technology Trends for 2018

Unlike any other time, technology is having a tremendous impact on the energy industry. Some of the major trends are in areas we’re familiar with, yet the level of activity has increased dramatically.

We see energy providers increasingly turning to information and communications technology to modernize the grid and improve situational awareness, with the goal of further maximizing the use of operational assets and optimizing the energy value chain. With specific expertise in these areas, we at Intel, along with our energy industry partners, are focused on the following technology trends for 2018:

 

Solar energy collectors.

 

1. Costs for Solar and Wind Power Continue to fall

In an increasingly larger number of countries, it has now become more economical to install solar and wind capacity than coal capacity. It is estimated that more than 30 countries have already reached grid parity without subsidies, and around two thirds of the world should reach grid parity in the next couple of years, according to the World Economic Forum.

 

2. Governments Invest in Green Energy

Countries are making green investment pledges to raise more money for climate action, as seen by commitments made at the Paris Climate Accord and the “One Planet” summit in Paris. Some of these efforts will drive the gasification of the coal industry in the short term and the growth of utility-scale solar and wind generation (off-shore and on-shore) in the long term to reduce the emission of pollutants.

 

3. Utility Companies Add Batteries to the Grid

Lithium-ion batteries are now a viable option to store energy on the grid, enabling utility companies to take full advantage of renewable energy sources despite their variable, intermittent output. One example is San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), which deployed a 30 MW lithium-ion battery system, capable of storing 120 MWh of energy and serving 20,000 customers for four hours.

 

4. Electric Vehicle Momentum Accelerates

A lack of ubiquitous and fast charging stations has caused potential electric vehicle (EV) owners to defer their purchase as they may not consider an EV as a replacement of their gasoline powered car. Some automakers and utilities see this as a big opportunity and plan to significantly increase the number of vehicle charging stations. Four automakers started a joint venture, called create Ionity, with plans to install a network of 400 high-power EV chargers across Europe by 2020; and French utility Engie bought Dutch EV-Box, one of Europe’s biggest makers of charging stations.

With EV charging destined to be a huge business opportunity, operators are trying figure out how to best compete in what will be a fiercely competitive market. This requires data collected on EVs (e.g., charge times, tire pressure, and vehicle performance), and consumer behavior and preferences. Early on, some operators may even give consumers free charges in order to get them to opt-into data collection programs. Data privacy will be a critical regulation consideration.

As EVs become more popular, the future of gas-powered vehicles is dimming, as countries such as China and France ready plans to end sales by around 2040. Even sooner, the Paris authorities plan to banish all petrol- and diesel-fueled cars from its city by 2030. This movement will fuel higher technology investment in EVs and charging stations.

 

5. Energy Production Gets Consumerized

A number of businesses and consumers already have solar panels on rooftops, and microgrids are emerging to give them more control over how they produce, consume, and sell energy. This is a way for companies and homeowners to become their own utility. One example is the Indian government, which is planning to build at least 10,000 renewable-based micro- and mini-grid projects across the country, with the goal of making electricity more reliable for consumers.

 

6. Distributed Generation Will Improve Grid Reliability

Utilities will integrate into their forecast the output of distributed energy resources (DERs), including distributed generation, distributed storage, electric vehicles, demand response, and microgrids. To maintain the reliability of the grid, it is critically important to monitor all these DERs in order to accurately forecast and respond to changes in energy production and demand. With a more active grid management, mitigation measures against the variability of renewable generation, unplanned outages, unbalanced networks, and excessive peak demand will be addressed using intelligent real-time analytics rather than brute force equipment uprating.

 

7. Utility Companies Deploy their own Communication Networks

Looking to reduce telco costs and have a dedicated control network, some utility companies will consider deploying their own 5G networks. These network would also allow utility companies to collect their own data wirelessly and generate revenue by selling bandwidth to content providers offering services to the home. Most suited for dense population areas, power-line communication (PLC) that sends data over existing power cables has been used for similar purposes. The combination of PLC and 5G will become an attractive option for utility private communication networks, supporting all their operational and business needs.

In my next blog, I will discuss how new technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT), real-time networking, virtualization, and deep learning adapted to the grid environment can be designed and deployed to better address these trends.

To learn about Intel energy solutions visit intel.com/energy. To stay informed about Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook and Twitter.

 


IoT@Intel

Five product trends to keep an eye for improvement of new or future iterations of products

You can always count on change as a constant in the Internet of Things (IoT). Here, David Grammer, PTC UK’s senior vice-president, describes five product trends we should keep an eye out for. The way that manufacturers manage information throughout the product lifecycle has changed significantly in the past few years.

The Internet of Things (IoT) has helped accelerate innovation in the design process, making it possible for manufacturers to receive information from products in the field that can be leveraged to improve new or future iterations of products. In order to succeed, organisations are going to need to embrace new technologies and capabilities available through enterprise system vendors.

Here are 5 trends in product design that engineers are going to be seeing and leveraging in the coming year:

Augmented Reality (AR) in design review

As teams become more globally distributed, it can sometimes be difficult to get everyone involved to review a product design in a timely manner, collect all the information needed for the review, and capture feedback for future action.

Using augmented reality (AR), team members are able to visualise, interact with, and provide feedback on product designs from anywhere in the world. AR makes it possible for stakeholders to interact with a 3D model of the product, such as walking around it and viewing different states of the model – including going inside the model itself. AR also enables users to get a third-party perspective from other teammates. This particularly comes in handy when deciphering notes from a colleague as it brings you to the point of view of the model they had when they made the comment.

IoT products transforming design practices

The market is clamoring for smart, connected products: whether it’s an Amazon Echo, a Nest Thermostat, or a Fitbit. In order to sufficiently meet the expectations of customers, manufacturers need to transform their product development process to understand and leverage data from products in the field. Noting product information on a CAD drawing is no longer going to cut it as products become more complex. Manufacturers will need to become more organised with their product development process.

Having a comprehensive PLM system provides a strong foundation to taking full advantage of IoT capabilities. By consolidating all product information into a single-view digital product definition, organisations can ensure that stakeholders are all accessing the most accurate, up-to-date product information. With a PLM system, all information is streamlined into a single easy-to-read Bill of Materials (BOM) list format.

Digitalisation

Product data is an organisation’s most valuable asset. With products gathering data from the field, this data is becoming more valuable every day. However, many organisations continue to keep it locked away with engineering and manufacturing. Product data can be leveraged throughout the enterprise: whether it is how the marketing team promotes the product or how the sales team sells it.

By digitising the product development process, stakeholders throughout the organisation will be able to easily access product information. For example, if a manufacturer just merged with or acquired another company, digitising the product development process and making […]

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Four Key Trends IIoT Platforms are Enlisting as Businesses Race to Convert Data into Insights

Four Key Trends IIoT Platforms are Enlisting as Businesses Race to Convert Data into Insights

Four Key Trends IIoT Platforms are Enlisting as Businesses Race to Convert Data into Insights

Frost & Sullivan reveals participants with single complementing competencies will join forces to protect market share and boost customer value.

Coupled with rapidly advancing Internet of Things (IoT) techniques, IoT platforms are set to create new business models aimed at enhanced connectivity, control and convergence.

Businesses are now racing to convert raw machine and process data into actionable and useful insights in real-time. IoT platforms are at the core of this revolution, providing users with the flexibility and tools needed to develop application-centric functions unique to each industry.

Frost & Sullivan Industrial Automation and Process Control Senior Research Analyst Sharmila Annaswamy, said:

“The IIoT ecosystem is rapidly evolving, and will witness acquisitions and collaborations on a large scale to close capability gaps. While major industrial participants with IT-OT expertise are leading the revolution, participants with single complementing competencies will join forces to protect market share and boost their customer value propositions.”

Four key industry trends in IIoT platforms:

  • Industry inclination towards self-service models is expected to advance Application Programming Interface (APIs) modules to the center of industrial IoT strategies;
  • Open cloud developer platforms such as Predix DOJO that allow collaboration between industry experts and in-house software developers is expected to accelerate proof-of-concept modeling for customers;
  • Satellite-based LPWAN technologies are expected to overpower cellular-based network technologies such as LTE-M,NB-IoT, and strengthen IoT use-cases for global asset tracking in oil and gas, and transportation; and
  • Artificial Intelligence engines and cognitive capabilities will soon become a hygiene factor in IIoT platforms primarily driven by the need to surpass the competition and boost solution performance.

“As factories and enterprises move toward a multi-cloud model, IoT platform providers will have to adopt automated load-balancing strategies to allow multi-cloud data transfers and elevate application performance across distinct cloud platforms”, noted Annaswamy.

Frost & Sullivan’s recent research, Landscaping IIoT Platforms—Vendor Clusters and Growth Prospects, compares and benchmarks Industrial IoT platforms and vendor clusters. It highlights the prevalent innovation hubs, key technology and business trends that are influencing the evolution of industrial IoT platforms, and profiles existing industrial IoT platforms such as Condence, Axoom, Losant, Datonis, Jasper, Bosch, Azure IoT, Thingworx, Mindsphere, Devicewise, Lumada, Leonardo, and Predix (GE).
To access more information on this analysis, please click here

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