Identity and Management of Things in the IoT a US$21.5 Billion Opportunity

Identity and Management of Things in the IoT a US$ 21.5 Billion Opportunity

Identity and Management of Things in the IoT a US$ 21.5 Billion Opportunity

IoT Platform services along with security, cryptography, digital certificate management and data exchange services are propelling IoT Identity and Management revenues toward US$ 21.5 billion by 2022.

ABI Research predicts that IDoT (Identity of Things) services are expected to grow significantly over the next five years with most of the revenues being driven primarily by industrial, manufacturing, and automotive market verticals.

“Through ‘smarter gateways’, cloud services, and application programming interface (API)-focused solutions, thing identity and management services are steadily finding their way in a wider spectrum of IoT verticals,” comments Dimitrios Pavlakis, Industry Analyst at ABI Research. Although certain verticals are still lagging in terms of security, IoT vendors are finally starting to invest more on encryption and device certificate management. Aftermarket telematics, fleet management, OEM telematics, metering, home security, and automation are among the most important verticals absorbing more than 60% of the total revenues worldwide.

“This brings us one step closer to the realization of IAM 2.0 (Identity and Access Management)”, continues Pavlakis.

“We are entering a transformational period where device IDs, system IDs, and user IDs are forced to merge under the hyper-connected IoT paradigms, effectively altering the way IDoT will be perceived from now on.”

To that end, open IoT standards and frameworks like OCF (Open Connectivity Foundation), OneM2m and DeviceHive are attempting to create OS/RTOS/Vendor-agnostic solutions to reduce friction for more interconnected and secure ecosystems.

While some vendors choose to offer wide-ranging IoT solutions, most of them are seeing the merit of specialization in IDoT:
enterprise and industrial (e.g., Microsoft Azure), connected agriculture (e.g., Bosch), advanced analytics and machine learning (e.g., SAP), cryptography and device management (e.g., Rambus), as well as energy and manufacturing (e.g., GE Predix). Given the recent PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) success stories in securing IoT devices, this specialization trend extends to most of the Certification Authorities (CAs) too: smart city, transportation and healthcare (e.g., DigiCert), cloud service providers (e.g., GlobalSign), banking and finance (e.g., IdenTrust), and enterprise and consumer (e.g., Comodo).

These findings are from ABI Research’s Thing Identity and Management Services report.

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SAS creates new global Internet of Things division

SAS, a provider of data analytics software, has created a new global division dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT) to help organisations from manufacturing to retail and healthcare reap the benefits of IoT.

The company’s new IoT division will be led by Jason Mann, who takes up the role of VP IoT. SAS adds the division will ‘develop new partnerships and expand existing ones to bring together best in class technology and expertise’.

Companies in SAS’ remit include GE Transportation, Lockheed Martin and Octo Telematics. The former is enlisting SAS to uncover use patterns through the Internet of Things that keep its trains on track. GE Transportation’s vehicles are given edge devices, managing hundreds of data elements each second, to optimise locomotive operation.

“The IoT is set to transform the way businesses in all industries think, act and sell,” said Peter Pugh-Jones, head of technology at SAS UK & Ireland. “That progress will be founded on data. The value of the IoT is in the information it produces about the world around us.

“SAS’s new IoT division will provide companies with the tools and capabilities they need to analyse and understand that data. With SAS they’ll be able to use the IoT to help make more intelligent decisions, introduce stronger AI and add value everywhere from production to supply chain to marketing and beyond.”

Plenty of organisations are moving towards creating a specific IoT division. One, as sister publication Enterprise CIO previously explored, enterprise mobility management (EMM) software provider MobileIron created a VP IoT role this time last year, filled by Wind River alumnus Santhosh Nair. This move can also relate to revenues; as of this year, Software AG is reporting cloud and IoT revenues separately.

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IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

Number of connected IoT devices to top 31 billion in 2018.

Driven by the need for intelligent connected devices in industrial and commercial applications, the number of connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices globally will grow to more than 31 billion in 2018, according to new analysis from business information provider IHS Markit.

The commercial and industrial sector, powered by building automation, industrial automation and lighting, is forecast to account for about half of all new connected devices between 2018 and 2030.

Jenalea Howell, research director for IoT connectivity and smart cities at IHS Markit, said:

“The IoT is not a recent phenomenon, but what is new is it’s now working hand in hand with other transformative technologies like artificial intelligence and the cloud. This is fueling the convergence of verticals such as industrial IoT, smart cities and buildings, and the connected home, and it’s increasing competitiveness.”

In its latest IoT Trend Watch report, IHS Markit identifies four key drivers and the trends that will impact the IoT this year and beyond:

Innovation and competitiveness

  • The IoT opportunity has attracted numerous duplicative and overlapping wireless solutions such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 5G, NB-IoT, LoRa and Sigfox. Standards consolidation lies ahead, but confusion and fragmentation will dominate in the near term.
  • Enterprises are leveraging the location of data as a competitive advantage — and as a result, a hybrid approach to cloud and data center management is taking hold. More and more companies will employ both on-premises data centers and off-premises cloud services to manage their IT infrastructure.

Business models

  • 5G builds upon earlier investments in M2M (machine-to-machine) and traditional IoT applications, enabling significant increases in economies of scale that drive adoption and utilization across all sectors of industry. Improved low-power requirements, the ability to operate on licensed and unlicensed spectrum, and better coverage will drive significantly lower costs across the IoT.
  • Cellular IoT gateways, which facilitate WAN connectivity, will be integral to edge computing deployments. 2018 will bring increased focus on compute capabilities and enhanced security for cellular IoT gateways.

Standardization and security

  • Cybersecurity is a leading concern for IoT adopters. IoT deployments face critical cybersecurity risks because there are potentially many more IoT devices to secure compared to traditional IT infrastructure devices, presenting increased risk to traditional communications and computing systems, as well as physical health and safety.
  • Despite the promise it holds, blockchain — a technology for securely storing and transferring data — is not a panacea. Initially, IoT applications for blockchain technology will focus on asset tracking and management.

Wireless technology innovation

  • IoT platforms are becoming more integrated. Currently, there are more than 400 IoT platform providers. Many vendors are using integration to compete more effectively, providing highly integrated functionality for IoT application developers and adopters.
  • Significant innovation will occur when IoT app developers can leverage data from myriad deployed sensors, machines and data stores. A key inflection point for the IoT will be the gradual shift from the current “Intranets of Things” deployment model to one where data can be exposed, discovered, entitled and shared with third-party IoT application developers.

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Internet of Things (IoT) Security Product Market to reach US$ 48 Bn by 2027

Internet of Things (IoT) Security Product Market to reach US$  48 Bn by 2027

Internet of Things (IoT) Security Product Market to reach US$  48 Bn by 2027

Increasing adoption of digital technologies including web-based services, online education, and online banking has accelerated adoption of smartphone among individuals, which in turn has necessitated security of such technologies against cyber-attacks.

Various governments across the globe have imposed stringent laws, in order to ensure secure environment and maintain privacy for connected devices. In addition, several enterprises are focusing on implementation of Internet of Things (IoT)-based solutions, encouraging employees in bringing their own devices for flexibility.

In its recent research, Future Market Insights (FMI) projects the global IoT security product market to register a staggering expansion at 14.9% CAGR through 2027.

In 2017, the market will account for revenues worth US$ 12,007.9 Mn, and it is further estimated to reach nearly US$ 50,000 Mn by 2027-end. This growth is primarily attributed to continuous launches of IoT security offerings by enterprises, soaring number of service providers, and emergence of niche players in the market.

FMI chart: IoT security product market value analysis

North America will Remain Dominant in the Global IoT Security Product Market

North America will remain dominant in the global IoT security product market, with sales estimated to reach nearly US$ 16,000 Mn in revenues by 2027-end. Government organisations of various North American countries have entered into partnership with major technology companies in order to implement IoT across urban cities. These organisations are also providing funds to technology vendors for development of IoT applications. In addition, increasing smart city projects in North America have led to a significant adoption of sensor applications. The aforementioned factors are anticipated to drive growth of IoT security product market in this region.

A number of government authorities have issued guidelines to be followed by IoT device manufacturers for protection against cyber-attacks on IoT devices and networks. However, several device manufacturers and users are not adhering to these guidelines, ignoring precautionary measures. This further has resulted into security lapses, incurring challenges for IoT security solutions providers, which is expected to restrain growth of the market in North America.

APEJ will Register Fastest Expansion in the Global IoT Security Products Market

Asia Pacific Excluding Japan (APEJ) will continue to be the fastest growing market for IoT security products, registering a high double-digit CAGR through 2027. Growing number of connected devices is leading towards expansion of IoT ecosystem in APEJ. This is further prompting the region’s leading companies for developing services and platforms, helping them in efficient management and analysis of real-time data streams gathered from multiple data sources. These companies are now focusing on IoT data analytics, and setting up strategies for procuring and deploying adequate tools in order to enable successful IoT adoption, and real-time analysis of operations. These factors are anticipated to drive demand for IoT security products in APEJ.

With rapidly changing technologies, enterprises are faced with difficulties in deploying technology-specific networks, which in turn is expected to impede market growth in this APEJ. In addition, rapid adoption of IoT among enterprises has led to a surge in cyber-attacks, owing to increasing internet exposure to a number of devices. This has further resulted into an increased chances of cyber-threats, which in turn is estimated to inhibit growth of the IoT security product market in APEJ.

Manufacturing to Remain the Largest Vertical for IoT Security Products

Manufacturing is estimated to remain the largest vertical for IoT security products in the global market. Revenues amassed from sales of IoT security products in manufacturing are expected to reach US$ 15,088.9 Mn by 2027-end. In addition, healthcare will be the fastest growing vertical in the global IoT security products market, followed by energy & utility, and transportation & logistics.

Although smart grid will remain sough-after among applications, home & building automation is expected to witness fastest expansion in the market through 2027. Revenues amassed from smart grid, and home & building automation applications of IoT security products will collectively account for revenues worth US$ 26,753.5 Mn by 2027-end.

Network security will remain preferred solution for IoT security products, with sales anticipated to account for nearly US$ 15,000 Mn by 2027-end. End-point/ device security will continue to be the second largest solution for IoT security products. In addition, vulnerability management solution for IoT security products will register fastest expansion through 2027.

By component, software will continue to retain its dominance in the global IoT security product market, with sales expanding at 15.2% CAGR through 2027. In addition, sales of hardware in the market is expected to surpass revenues worth US$ 20,000 Mn by 2027-end.

Key market players identified in FMI’s report include IBM Corporation, Cisco System Inc., Intel Corporation, Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., Trend Micro Inc., Infineon Technologies, Symantec Technologies, Sophos Group PLC, Palo Alto Networks, ARM Holding PLC.

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Connecting hardware and software lifecycles to build the Internet of Things

Traditional software development practices and tools can’t scale up to support the accelerated delivery cycles and iterations of products designed for the Internet of Things. You need modern tools and practices designed for the IoT to succeed.

In the past, traditional development methodologies were waterfall and led in one direction: from design to deployment, with little data coming back to the development team from deployed products. However, in the Internet of Things, embedded software and sensors in the hardware send operational data back for analysis and action back to the developers. Real-world usage data is now available for developers to improve the quality and usability of their products quickly. We refer to the IoT development process as a feedback loop.

Teams that have successfully leveraged agile methods to improve software delivery now want to carry that over to hardware, to apply the same agile methods to mechanical, electrical design and manufacturing processes.  They are challenged with connecting software, hardware and device services components together and linking together the engineering disciplines that deliver these components of the completed product.

Hardware and software configurations evolve at different rates, and keeping track of which software goes with which hardware requires clear connections. As product complexity increases, each component’s configuration and its linkages across the overall product configuration can soon become unmanageable without a system to support the process.

Product lifecycle management

In product lifecycle management (PLM), hardware configurations are managed through the Bill of Materials (BOM). There are several types of BOM including the electrical design, mechanical design and manufactured assembly, such that now a “product” is actually a “system” – and you need a way to trace the parts of that system and their dependencies across the phases of the product development (and deployment) lifecycle with clear linkages. In IoT, this is sometimes referred to as the “digital thread”—the traceability through the nodes of a BOM through its lifecycle and back.

In application lifecycle management (ALM), software configurations are managed through software change and configuration management tools. The capabilities of these tools have become increasingly critical to successful software development as software complexity has increased, software supply chains of different component vendors have evolved, and agile methods have become important to the timely delivery of software.

In the context of IoT development, linking your software configurations with your hardware BOMs is vital to successfully delivering a quality product that can be evolved in the light of changing customer needs informed by operational feedback. Rapid and accurate understanding of the impacts of changes across the whole IoT product, including all aspects of hardware and software, is critical to the IoT lifecycle.

The linking of the worlds of ALM and PLM in this way is a difficult challenge; PLM and ALM tools are typically supplied by different vendors and are often deeply embedded in an organization’s engineering and development processes. ‘Rip and replace’ of existing environments often simply isn’t an option; you need connectivity between the worlds of PLM and ALM.

Linking ALM and PLM is a big step toward digital transformation of product development and realizing the “digital thread”.

Learn how IBM is linking ALM and PLM.

 

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