Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and 18 Others Compared in MachNation’s Newest IoT Platform ScoreCard

Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and 18 Others Compared in MachNation's Newest IoT Platform ScoreCard

Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and 18 Others Compared in MachNation's Newest IoT Platform ScoreCard

MachNation announces the availability of its IoT Application Enablement Platform (AEP) ScoreCard for 2018, an in-depth rating of 21 Internet of Things (IoT) platform vendors.

According to MachNation forecast data, IoT platform revenue will grow 89% in 2018. MachNation forecasts that 2018 IoT platform revenue will reach USD3.3 billion with increased purchasing from enterprises in manufacturing, automotive, logistics/distribution, utility and smart cities sectors. Rather than building their own platforms, MachNation finds that enterprises are choosing to purchase cloud-based offerings from best-in-class IoT AEP vendors.

chart: IoT forecasts - IoT application enablement and device management platform revenue 2017-2026“MachNation’s fourth annual ScoreCard is the industry’s largest, longest-running, most complete, independent evaluation of IoT platforms,” said Dima Tokar, CTO and head analyst, MachNation. “Enterprises, service providers, systems integrators and application developers use MachNation’s ScoreCard to gain critical information about top-tier platforms in the global market.”

Many of the IoT platforms evaluated in the ScoreCard are separately evaluated in MachNation IoT Test Environment (MIT-E), MachNation’s hands-on test and comparison lab. MachNation is the only firm in the world that conducts hands-on tests of IoT platforms and makes test-based comparison data available for platforms like Microsoft IoT, Amazon AWS IoT, IBM Watson IoT, Software AG Cumulocity IoT and others.

MachNation’s ScoreCard contains several quadrants and matrices to help clarify a muddy, yet booming platform ecosystem. The ScoreCard ranks vendors using 15 detailed technical and business criteria including developer focus, deployment models, operational sophistication, partnerships and strategy.

“Platform vendors all have similar marketing for their products,” said Samuel Hale, analyst and testing specialist, MachNation.

“If you’re serious about understanding platform differences, you need to dig deeply into their products and capabilities. Our ScoreCard and MIT-E do that.”

According to Hale, “In order to capture the key trends in the ecosystem, we completed an in-depth analysis of the following vendors: Amazon, AT&T, Axonize, Ayla Networks, Bosch, ClearBlade, Ericsson, HPE, Huawei, IBM, InterDigital, Microsoft, Oracle, PTC, Relayr, SAP, Scriptr.io, SiteWhere, Software AG, Telit and TheThings.iO.”

For more information, please visit http://bit.ly/2H9q2vJ

The post Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and 18 Others Compared in MachNation’s Newest IoT Platform ScoreCard appeared first on IoT Business News.

IoT Business News

Smart city scorecard urges cities to remain citizen-focused amidst technological change

If you want to work out where the greatest innovation is taking place in the smart city realm – then a new scorecard prepared by the Visionary Innovation Group (VIG) appears to be a good indicator.

The VIG, an arm of analyst firm Frost & Sullivan, has evaluated 50 global cities through qualitative and quantitative filters in its report. The first filter takes into consideration the indicators which gauge the effectiveness of smart city initiatives by comparing present and past indicator measurements. These indicators are grouped into four categories; the circulation of goods and residents, the quality of the lived environment, technology penetration level, and expansion of a knowledge economy.

Following the quantitative filtering, the top 30 cities are assessed against VIG's Smart City Maturity Model, which ranks cities on a scale of 1 (ad hoc) to 5 (synergized) for the following factors: governance; investment; data; IoT and platform; and business model maturity. Following this, the top 15 cities are profiled within each of these maturity model areas. Cities evaluated in the ranking include Berlin, London, New York City, Paris, and Singapore.

According to the report, there are three key takeaways for smart cities; continuing to innovate, connect back to their clear vision and goals, and take the lead in finding novel ways to address city challenges.

“The critical success factors of smart cities include staying citizen-focused,” the report notes. “It’s easy to get lost in the technology and initiatives, but everything must serve the larger purpose of addressing citizen needs. The second success factor is to map all initiatives to clear and aligned smart city objectives, which in turn, must be aligned with an overall smart city vision.

“In short, smart cities are most successful when they have a strategy and centralised leadership to ensure that strategy is enacted,” the report adds.

Elsewhere, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) and Deloitte have made major investments at Consumer Electronics Show 2018 (CES) with the aim of highlighting smart cities technology. Bosch, Ford, Nissan, and Ericsson are among companies that are pioneering new solutions including smart transportation, smart grids, public safety, cybersecurity, health care, AI, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). 2018’s CES will dedicate 11,000 square feet to The Smart Cities Marketplace, featuring smart city-enabling technology and solutions.

You can find out more about the scorecard here.

iottechnews.com: Latest from the homepage

IoT And The New COO Scorecard

“Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance,” said Kong Qui, better known as Confucius. I doubt he had chief operating officers (COOs) in mind when he said it, but 2,000 years later, he still makes a good a point. The Internet of Things (IoT) is taking us into unprecedented disruption, opportunity, and innovation. Business models are fluid, existing processes are becoming less relevant, and for many, we don’t know what we don’t know yet. IoT is not only changing how we do things, but also the definitions of our roles and our measurements of success – particularly for COOs. If ever there was a time for a bit of professional navel gazing, it’s now.

In the same way that CEOs and founders need entrepreneurial skills to devise new business ideas and create a culture of innovation, COOs must also be somewhat “intrapreneurial.” But that remit is changing from operational to transformational. And not everyone knows how to get there.

In my last blog, I touched on the transformational effect of IoT on almost every division and line of business head in the organization. Here I’ll talk specifically about COOs, because they’re at the digital coalface leading this transformation.

Of course, business transformation is hardly a new concept for a COO, but the seismic impact of IoT has permanently raised the bar. A new playing field with unparalleled processes, potential, and performance metrics is redefining what success looks like.  So much so that IDC has created a scorecard for the new COO remit, giving actionable evaluation measures and advice on how to think and execute differently in the brave new world of digital transformation. (If you’ve not yet seen it, it’s worth a read for the success of your future career, not just your current role.)

As organizations digitally mature, the KPIs for COOs are becoming more closely aligned to the broader organizational objectives with subtle, yet critical, interdependencies. IDC’s COO Scorecard identifies five key dimensions for these KPIs:

  1. Operational vision. The ability to gain active responsibility for technology governance while maintaining fidelity to corporate IT standards and guidelines.
  1. Connected assets and processes. The ability to connect corporate assets to improve effectiveness (inclusive of efficiency, reliability, and availability) and to digitally connect processes, both intracompany and intercompany, to create a more responsive operating capability.
  1. Connected experiences. The ability to support corporate’s transformation initiative based on digitally connected products and services to enable higher levels of customer satisfaction and to unlock information-based revenue opportunities.
  1. Intelligent decision making. The ability to connect corporate strategy with operational decision making, down to tactical plans, on an organizational scale.
  1. Talent and culture. The ability to create an environment where people are committed and enabled to change, where employees at any level move in the same direction promoting the same shared values.

What we are talking about here is essentially changing the COO’s remit from a utility to a transformer – and mastering that change in the process. The real issue is not if a company’s business model will transform (competition and disruption will typically take care of that), but rather whether COOs understand how best to steer the ship while this is happening. I don’t just wish you success in your company’s transformation, but also the digital acumen for you to make it happen.

Check out The COO Scorecard for Digital Transformation to see how you’re doing in advancing your organization’s digital maturity.


Internet of Things – Digitalist Magazine