IoT identity and management revenues to hit $21.5bn by 2022, says ABI Research

ABI Research projects that revenues from IoT identity and management are heading to hit the $ 21.5 billion benchmark by 2022, driven by IoT platform services together with security, cryptography, digital certificate management and data exchange services.

According to predictions put forward by the advisory firm in its report “​Thing Identity and Management Services”, IDoT (Identity of Things) services will realise robust growth over the next five years driven primarily by the industrial, manufacturing, and automotive industries.

Dimitrios Pavlakis, industry analyst at ABI Research, said: “Through ‘smarter gateways’, cloud services, and application programming interface (API)-focused solutions, thing identity and management services are steadily finding their way in a wider spectrum of IoT verticals.”

Although some industries are not so up-to-date in terms of security, vendors in the IoT market are finally making investment moves in encryption and device certificate management. Some of the leading verticals that are eating up over 60% of the total global revenues include aftermarket telematics, fleet management, OEM telematics, metering, home security, and automation.

Elsewhere, a BCC Research report projected that the value of the global IoT networking solutions market is anticipated to reach $ 1 trillion by 2022 at a CAGR of 21.6%. The report titled “Internet of Things (IoT) Networks: Technologies and Global Markets to 2022” highlighted that the Asia Pacific’s IoT networking solutions market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 27.6% through 2022, followed by Europe with a CAGR of 23.8% and market share of 31.3%.

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Only one in four organisations can protect themselves against IoT threats, says survey

A survey from UK-based firm Databarracks has found that only 27% of organisations polled feel able to protect themselves against IoT threats.

Based on the findings, its managing director Peter Groucutt has said that organisations must now factor IoT into their continuity planning.

“The IoT device market is still relatively immature and somewhat of a Wild West,” said Groucutt. “According to industry experts, by 2020 there will be over 50 billion connected devices. Understandably, manufacturers are racing to capitalise on the opportunity, but unfortunately, many are doing so at the expense of basic security measures.

“Organisations need to be aware of these risks, even if they do not use any IoT devices – the growing number of connected devices globally means there is an increased risk of DDoS attacks through IoT botnets – but our data suggests firms are ignoring these threats,” added Groucutt. “Research from our annual Data Health Check survey revealed that only 13% of businesses saw IoT threats as a major concern. Additionally, just over a quarter of organisations (27%) had set policies in place designed to protect against IoT threats.”

According to Groucutt, organisations incorporating IoT devices into their IT infrastructure should not rely on existing policies for evaluating the security of devices, instead develop new ones. Questions such as what protocol the device uses; can the IoT network be isolated from our other systems; is it connecting directly back to the data centre or to a hub – either in the cloud (hosted externally) or to an Edge server that you manage; how do we login and authenticate; can we integrate with our existing authentication products, and finally, what O/S is used and do we have competency; should be considered.

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Executives lack confidence when it comes to Industry 4.0, says Deloitte

Executives lack confidence when it comes to Industry 4.0, says Deloitte

Recruitment and training at every level in the corporate hierarchy may need a rethink, if companies are to reap the full benefits of industrial IoT, says a new report from Deloitte. 

Senior business executives are optimistic about the potential offered by Industry 4.0, but lack confidence when it comes to investing in the industrial IoT. 

That’s according to a new report from Deloitte, The Fourth Industrial Revolution is Here – Are You Ready? Released to coincide with the World Economic Forum this week in Davos, Switzerland, this explores the business world’s readiness to  harness the opportunities offered by the Industry 4.0 trend that sees machines increasingly become connected and able to report on their status and performance, as well as the environment around them.

Sometimes referred to as ‘the fourth industrial revolution’, it is set to define the business world over the next few years, as technologies such as sensors, analytics, AI, cognitive computing are increasingly applied to industrial processes. 

Deloitte Global, part of the management consultancy firm, surveyed 1,600 C-level executives from 19 countries for its report, quizzing them on their ability to leverage these technologies. 

Read more: Survey shows IIoT has “crossed the chasm”, claims Zebra

Lack of confidence

Almost nine out of ten respondents (87 percent) said that they expect Industry 4.0 to create social and economic equality and stability for their companies. But regardless of this, many firms feel that they’re not ready to harness these changes. Only one in three said they’re highly confident about stewarding their organisations in the connected world and just 14 percent said they were ready to implement Industry 4.0 technologies. Because of these attitudes, says Deloitte, businesses and executives risk falling behind.

At the same time, executives don’t feel that their organizations have the right talent to succeed in the fourth industrial revolution, either – but they’re trying their best to build more suitable teams. Again, more than four out five respondents (86 percent) said they’re working to hire people with the right skillsets for technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and IoT. 

And companies that are already focused on Industry 4.0 are exploring roles that allow staff to leverage “greater innovation, alternative work environments and new approaches to learning and development”.

Overall, key decision-makers are aware that they must invest in technology to succeed in an increasingly connected world. But many of them are struggling to make a business case due to a lack of comprehensive strategies.

Read more: IIoT adoption increases, but projects still early-stage, says Bsquare

A unique opportunity

Punit Renjen, CEO of Deloitte Global, has claimed that the fourth industrial revolution will have huge impact on the world as a whole, and not just the workplace. “The rapidly advancing technologies driving Industry 4.0 are bringing about social and economic change rapidly in an environment of unparalleled global connectivity and demographic change,” he said. 

“It’s a time of great opportunity, but also risk. We developed this research to better understand how executives are navigating the pervasive shift and to uncover areas where they can more effectively influence how the Fourth Industrial Revolution impacts their organisations and society.”


Our Internet of Manufacturing event is coming to Munich on 6-8 February 2018. Attendees will get the chance to learn more about how connected technologies open up new paths to increased productivity and profitability for industrial companies. 

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IoT deployment doubles among New Zealand enterprises in 2017, says IDC

The implementation of IoT solutions among enterprises in New Zealand has increased two-fold to 25.7% in 2017 from 13.7% in 2016, according to IDC.

IDC New Zealand’s yearly Internet of Things Decision Maker Report explains how the companies understand the advantages of deploying IoT and implement the solution to boost productivity and enhance customer related experience.

Explaining the reason behind the increase, Monica Collier, research manager for telecommunications, IDC New Zealand, said: "New Zealand organisations are understanding that the value of the Internet of Things is in the data it produces and, more importantly, what that data enables companies to act upon or improve. Additionally, endpoint costs continue to decrease and the range of connectivity options is increasing; it's easier to get an IoT business case across the line."

The report highlighted that the organisations implementing IoT solutions are more influenced by improving customer experience, than fixing internal processes. 

Summarising the opportunities associated with IoT, Collier concluded: "The New Zealand IoT Alliance research says that IoT could bring NZ$ 2.2 billion of benefit to the New Zealand economy over the next ten years. Our report illustrates how companies have understood that message and are implementing IoT to increase productivity and improve customer experience."

Alongside this, another newly published report by IDC presents a detailed analysis of enterprises providing cellular connectivity management and/or other capabilities such as device management for IoT. The report titled “IDC MarketScape: Worldwide IoT Platforms (Device and Network Connectivity Providers) 2018 Vendor Assessment” profiled 11 vendors including AT&T, Cisco, Ericsson and Verizon. The report has highlighted several factors that technology buyers need to consider while evaluating providers for IoT platform connectivity.

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AI-Powered Smartphones will be critical differentiator, says Gartner

According to the recent study, Gartner reveals that on-device Artificial Intelligence (AI) features will become a critical product differentiator for smartphone vendors. This will help them to acquire new customers while retaining current users. Over the next two years, AI solutions running on the smartphone will become an essential part of vendor roadmaps.

Gartner predicts that by 2022, 80 percent of smartphones shipped will have on-device AI capabilities, up from 10 percent in 2017. On-device Artificial Intelligence (AI) is currently limited to premium devices and provides better data protection and power management than full cloud-based AI, since data is processed and stored locally.

In the report, Gartner has identified 10 high-impact uses for AI-powered smartphones to enable vendors to provide more value to their customers.

1)    “Digital Me” Sitting on the Device

Smartphones will be an extension of the user, capable of recognizing them and predicting their next move.

2)    User Authentication

Security technology combined with machine learning, biometrics and user behavior will improve usability and self-service capabilities.

3)    Emotion Recognition

The proliferation of virtual personal assistants and other AI-based technology for conversational systems is driving the need to add emotional intelligence for better context and an enhanced service experience.

4)    Natural-Language Understanding

Continuous training and deep learning on smartphones will improve the accuracy of speech recognition, while better understanding the user’s specific intentions.

5)    Augmented Reality (AR) and AI Vision

With the release of iOS 11, Apple included an ARKit feature that provides new tools to developers to make adding Augmented Reality (AR) to apps easier. One example of how AR can be used is in apps that help to collect user data and detect illnesses such as skin cancer or pancreatic cancer.

6) Device Management

Machine learning will improve device performance and standby time. For example, with many sensors, smartphones can better understand and learn user’s behavior, such as when to use which app.

7) Personal Profiling

Smartphones can collect data for behavioral and personal profiling. Users can receive protection and assistance dynamically, depending on the activity that is being carried out and the environments they are in (e.g., home, vehicle, office, or leisure activities).

8)    Content Censorship/Detection

Restricted content can be automatically detected. Objectionable images, videos or text can be flagged, and various notification alarms can be enabled.

9) Personal Photographing

Personal photographing includes smartphones that are capable to automatically produce beautified photos based on a user’s individual aesthetic preferences.

10)     Audio Analytic

The smartphone’s microphone can continuously listen to real-world sounds. AI capability on device enable them to tell those sounds, and instruct users or trigger events.                                                 Read more…

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