Vodafone and Mango make digital fitting rooms a reality

Vodafone and Mango make digital fitting rooms a reality

Vodafone and Mango make digital fitting rooms a reality

Vodafone announced today that it is working with Mango, the global high street fashion retailer, on a new programme to rollout digital fitting rooms to the company’s top stores worldwide.

The digital fitting room has been designed around a new Internet of Things (IoT) digital mirror designed by Mango, developed by Vodafone in collaboration with Jogotech, which will allow the shopper to scan the clothes tags in the fitting room and then contact shop floor staff directly from the mirror, through a digital watch, to request different sizes or colours. The mirror will also suggest additional clothes to complement the original choice.

Mango’s aim is to extend the digital fitting room to its top stores, from Barcelona to New York and will help to blend the online and real world shopping experiences for the Mango customers. This is the first phase of a digital transformation project for Mango to create new ways for customers to engage and relate to the brand.

Vodafone Director of Internet of Things Stefano Gastaut commented:
“This project helps put more power at the shopper’s fingertips and will bring Mango closer to its fashion conscious shoppers and offer them more options and experiences than a conventional fitting room.”

Mango’s Chief Client Officer Guillermo Corominas added:

“This is a really exciting project for Mango. We see the future of retailing as a blend of the online and the offline. These new fitting rooms are another step in the digital transformation of our stores to create a whole new experience for our customers.”

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Five ways remote access will transform everything from cashpoints to living rooms

As a digital economy breaks down boundaries between industries, supply chains, employees and customers, we will see new remote access technology creating interconnectivity between companies, workers and consumers in 2018. Company support staff will be able to ‘remote in’ to cars and set-top boxes, delivering connected customer support across millions of IoT devices from the road to the living room. Workers will increasingly ‘remote into’ devices in other departments, divisions or training centres, creating cross-departmental collaboration, learning and oversight, says Adam Byrne, COO at RealVNC.

Future remote access technology will even enable remote human intervention in vehicles, creating interconnected transport ecosystems where everyone from technicians to fleet managers can ‘remote in’ to cars to fix faults, warn drivers, reduce emissions or even view police car chases in real-time from any location.

Below RealVNC outlines five ways remote access is set to transform our lives:

Bank managers will help you from within cashpoints

2018 will see the transformation of the cashpoint into a smart, all-seeing, all-doing ‘bank in a box’ that enable people to obtain audio or video support from bank managers, deposit coins and even make ‘cardless’ withdrawals without ever entering a branch.

The key will be the creation of ‘smart’ cashpoints that replicate bank branches, by using the remote access technology that IT help desks use to allow bank staff to ‘log in’ to ATMs and guide customers through transactions in real-time. Crucially, banks will be able to see inside the ATM and fix faults or remotely update and even upgrade cashpoints from any location.

Banks are particularly sensitive to the loss of an older customer demographic because these are also the wealthiest customers and they are the most resistant to automation and branch closures due to the loss of human interaction. Financial institutions face the dilemma of ensuring that branch closures do not impact a lucrative market segment that attaches considerable importance to customer service and human interaction. Remote access technology will now enable banks to automate services without losing the human touch.

Trainees and support staff will be able to ‘remote in’ to training centres and even living rooms

As the digital economy increasingly pulls down the barriers between geographies, sectors and people, we will begin to see companies and consumers using remote access technology to deliver real-time, remote customer support inside everything from data centres to living rooms.

Already, some pioneering enterprises are reaching out into customer homes by enabling staff to ‘remote in’ to TV set-top boxes and deliver real-time customer support from any location. Other companies are conversely allowing customers to ‘log in’ to training servers in other countries and receive virtual training from any location in the world.

The same is happening for workers. Some enterprises will allow real-time interconnectivity between tens of thousands of employee devices by enabling employees to ‘remote into’ everything from ‘smartboards’ to tablets across departments in real-time, creating cross-sector training and collaboration and allowing companies to oversee and enforce policies from anywhere, on the move.

Vehicle fleets will be remote-controlled

The combination of remote access technology and live telematics data means […]

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Check in to new cognitive hotel rooms and check out connected experiences

Remember the last time you stayed in a hotel? Did you remember what time the restaurant opened for breakfast? Were you able to work the thermostat for the air conditioning? And after that long-haul flight when you woke up at silly o’clock, did you struggle to find the switch for the bedside lamp and turn on all the room lights instead? These are just some of the niggles that have now been ironed out with cognitive hotel rooms – a new initiative from Harman Professional Solutions and IBM Watson Internet of Things. Welcome to a stay in a ‘Voice-Enabled Cognitive Room’.

Hotel rooms – at your service

Using IBM’s Watson artificial intelligence technology and Harman AKG microphones, JBL speakers and AMX AV control and switching systems, these new hotel rooms are truly at your service. Just talk to the room the way that you’d talk to a friend and a myriad of services and hotel features are at your command. The capabilities extend wider too – to medical facilities, offices, cruise ships, any many more.

Improved accessibility for hotel guests

This will be a boon for every traveler, particularly those with additional needs in areas such as vision and mobility. There’s no longer a need to find the air-con controls to change the temperature. Gone are the printed books with the numbers for the front desk and room service. Setting an alarm on a clock radio you’ve not seen before is no longer a mystery – just ask what you’d like and the room responds. Hotel concierge facilities are opened up too. When is the gym open? Just ask your room. Need to book a connection to the airport, or better yet, extend your stay? Just ask your room. Has your mini-bar run dry? Simply place your order with your room and it’ll be right up.

Over time, the system will remember your preferences and set your hotel room to your desired settings when you arrive. It could base this not just on your hotel preferences, but how you like things at home too. Your hotel room will soon become even more of a ‘home away from home’.

Patients are already benefiting from similar capabilities currently in use at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Patients can ask their hospital room to change settings such as lights and window blinds, and ask about hospital facilities or information about their caring professionals.

Hotel efficiency improved through speech translation

Hotel efficiency can be improved too. Using Watson’s natural language understanding and language translation services, guest service and in-house technical staff members can log maintenance issues in their own language. Send and engineer to fix the shower. Book a maintenance slot for a noisy air-con unit. Replace a broken lamp stand. Make a request in one language and it can be translated into another.

Opening new brand experience opportunities

Hey Siri. Alexa. Ok Google. We’re getting used to ‘wake words’. This system works with wake words too. The hotel can customise the system to their chosen word(s) which adds another avenue of brand building to the visitor experience. I wonder if the Ritz will ‘Ask Jeeves’?

Voice enabled cognitive rooms by IBM Watson and Harman will be open for reservations in mid-2017. There are more details in this Voice Enabled Cognitive Rooms press release. You can also find out more about how the internet of things is shaping cognitive buildings, and to stay ahead of news items like this, sign up to the monthly IoT Sense newsletter.

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