Unlicenced Low Power M2M Connections to Approach 400 Million by 2022, Threatening Operators’ ROI

Unlicenced Low Power M2M Connections to Approach 400 Million by 2022, Threatening Operators’ ROI

Unlicenced Low Power M2M Connections to Approach 400 Million by 2022, Threatening Operators’ ROI

A new report from Juniper Research has found that the total number of connections leveraging an unlicenced spectrum to deliver low power M2M connectivity will approach 400 million by 2022.

Connections using these technologies, such as Sigfox, LoRa and Ingenu, will rise from an estimated 50 million by the end of 2018, representing total growth of 736%.

Operators Face Low Power M2M Market Share Battle

The new research, Low Power M2M: Technology Impact Analysis, Vertical Assessment & Forecasts 2018-2022, found that connectivity providers offering low-cost unlicenced alternatives to cellular technologies such as NB-IoT and LTE-M, will threaten operators’ return on investment. It found that overall service revenues from unlicenced low power connections will be 102% higher than those over their cellular counterparts by 2022.

Without the cost of spectrum acquisition or radio development, unlicenced connections can be implemented rapidly, and cost-effectively. As a result, the report urged mobile operators to set cellular low power M2M prices accordingly, highlighting their superior capabilities and network reach over unlicenced connections to justify their higher subscription price and module cost.

In addition, research author Sam Barker noted:

“Unlicenced spectrum M2M service providers must focus on rapid expansion of their networks’ coverage in order to offer the same breadth of services that can be offered by network operators.”

Operator Low Power M2M Opportunity

Meanwhile, the report found that cellular low power M2M connections will approach 100 million by 2022. Higher data rates and ubiquitous coverage of these cellular networks will accelerate smart city deployments, forecasting that low power cellular smart city connections will grow at an average annual growth rate of 313% over the next 4 years.

The research claimed that sensors must leverage low power cellular networks if they require a data connection for reliable OTA (over the air) updates and IP-based communication. It found that the long range capabilities of cellular low power networks, geographical coverage and high data rates will be a key differentiator from unlicenced spectrum networks.

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IoT Business News

Taking Flight With Aerospace: The Power Of Digital

Market experts predict the world’s fleet of commercial aircraft will double in size over the next 20 years. This is due to increasing demand from growing markets like China. Industry leaders can secure their market share if they use an integrated approach to innovation and technology.

Faced with growing market demand, aviation companies are under pressure to speed delivery of new aircraft while implementing digital technologies to improve productivity and reduce manufacturing delays. The aerospace firms that are successful in these efforts will be able to stay within schedules and budgets, focus more intently on global expansion, and attract the best industry talent. But the road ahead is full of challenges.

The complexity of aerospace

The global impact of the aerospace industry is quite impressive. Last year alone, it provided the infrastructure to transport over 3.7 billion passengers. Aviation companies also delivered more than 1,800 new commercial aircraft, and launched 85 orbital space missions. Many of today’s innovations depend on technology coming out of the aerospace world. As an example, imagine smartphones without GPS capabilities, a technology developed in aerospace.

The digitalization of aerospace will drive innovation to produce smarter, more efficient aircraft. Already, modern planes can create over 0.5 TB of data for each flight, as input for next-generation services and groundbreaking 3D printing advances – targeting both primary and replacement parts – are enabling equipment manufacturers to better meet service-level agreements and increase uptime. More than ever, success depends on strong engineering to meet the highest quality and safety standards and a strong focus on the integrated approach to innovation.

Challenging traditional paradigms

Aerospace is one of the most regulated and controlled industries in the world and traditionally has not been made up of “rule breakers.” But innovation in this industry does happen when key players challenge their own business processes, then redefine those processes using an array of new technologies.

Two strong examples of this approach come from commercial aerospace manufacturing. Emerging player SpaceX has redefined the rules of space travel and transformed how payloads are sent into space, delivering an operational model with significantly reduced costs. In contrast, the well-established Lockheed Martin is relying heavily on technology, in the form of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning, to protect people and products. The company is also using a blockchain strategy to speed the discovery and solution of cybersecurity problems and has relied on 3D modeling for many years.

The economics of innovation

The aerospace industry has seen tremendous benefits from technological innovation. 3D printing, for example, has helped redefine the process and cost of manufacturing components. Recently, GE produced a 3D-printed 1,300HP advanced turboprop engine. But while 3D printing an entire engine is impressive, aircraft parts will gain the most from this technology.

With fleets always on the go, it’s difficult to anticipate what parts a plane will need and the optimal service location to store them. A grounded airplane can quickly become an expensive problem, with the estimated cost of a typical “B check” maintenance issue near $ 60,000 USD. 3D printed parts help avoid that scenario and improve fleet uptime and reduce costs.

The industry has also been an early adopter and innovator of IoT technology. Maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) is the daily task of managing the upkeep of aircraft. Checking working systems and how they interconnect requires data gathering and analysis. Technicians, OEM parts manufacturers, and carriers tend to take a more reactive approach to maintenance. This leads to downtime, delayed flights, and aircraft on the ground (AOG) issues during busy airport hours.

IoT enables companies to launch predictive maintenance initiatives. Maintenance technicians gain an understanding of current known issues through available data. They can also see the time remaining until equipment failure. The maintenance techs then have enough information and time to make repairs before major issues arise.

Soaring with a digital core

Technology modernization, including cloud computing, is a top priority for aerospace. Most aviation companies operate in a hybrid environment. In this situation, cloud-based systems interact with on-premises applications, enabling companies to secure intellectual property while enjoying cloud benefits for traditional business applications, HR, and other things.

Aerospace companies that capitalize on the following strategic priorities will succeed in the changing market:

  1. Customer-centricity. Putting the customer’s point of view at the center of every decision is vital for success in the digital age. Providing tailored benefits, improving product performance, and outcome-oriented service models are key.
  1. Digital business networks. Enabling collaboration and leveraging knowledge benefits all business partners. Scalable and secure, many-to-many networks distribute critical, real-time business information across the network.
  1. Innovation. With even more technology embedded, OEMs aim to make products smarter, more reliable, and affordable for customers.
  1. Agile manufacturing. Advanced automation and integration provide data for process improvement and proof of compliance.
  1. New business models. New digital technologies disrupt traditional business models. The results include process evolution, new market opportunities, and new revenue streams.

Learn how to bring new technologies and services together to power digital transformation by downloading The IoT Imperative for Discrete Manufacturers: Automotive, Aerospace and Defense, High Tech, and Industrial Machinery. Explore how to bring Industry 4.0 insights into your business today by reading Industry 4.0: What’s Next?


Internet of Things – Digitalist Magazine

Kerlink Will Launch Latest Low Power IoT Reference Design at Embedded World

Kerlink Will Launch Latest Low Power IoT Reference Design at Embedded World

Kerlink Will Launch Latest Low Power IoT Reference Design  at Embedded World

Kerlink, a specialist and global leader in solutions dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT), will release its latest Low Power IoT Reference Design during Embedded World in Nuremberg, Germany, Feb. 27-March 1.

Kerlink’s Low Power IoT Reference Design is a turnkey combination of electronics blueprint, performance benchmarks, recommended bill of material and best practices guidelines for designing antennas, batteries and connectors integration.

It also provides a benchmark device and test bed for directly testing and comparing prototypes, and simplifies and accelerates the design, development and production of devices based on LoRa® technology, while speeding time to market and reducing development costs.

This new reference design is part of Kerlink’s strategy to help OEMs, electronics device makers, device designers and service providers launch new connected products for the IoT using LoRa® technology. The company’s Advanced Services Business Unit is broadening Kerlink’s portfolio to offer value added solutions and services, on top of its existing IoT network infrastructure and operations offerings.

“Kerlink is one of the world’s largest suppliers of gateways, stations and other equipment for LoRaWAN™ IoT networks,” said Stéphane Dejean, the company’s chief marketing officer.

“These reference design leverage that expertise for LoRa® technology device designers and OEMs that want to put the IoT to work for their companies and their customers quickly and simply.”

Tekelek, a leading developer and manufacturer of telemetry products and solutions for gas-tank monitoring, and Maddalena, a leader in smart water metering, have used an early version of the reference design to create new devices for customers.

“Both companies have reported significantly reduced time to market with their new LoRaWAN™ devices and lower design and prototyping costs, while achieving complete compliance with the latest state-of-the-art specifications,” Dejean said.

Kerlink is launching the new reference design at Embedded World with Alpha-Omega Technology GmbH, a German company that specializes in international IoT hardware sales and consulting with a focus on wireless sensor networks using the LoRaWAN™ protocol. Kerlink will present its solutions and show demonstration during Embedded World on the booth shared with Alpha Omega located 3A-240.

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IoT Business News

Chirp and EDF Energy team up on power station connectivity project

Chirp and EDF Energy team up on power station connectivity project

Tech start-up Chirp and utility EDF Energy have been awarded a £100,000 Innovate UK grant to explore data-over-sound in radio-frequency restricted environments.

Data-over-sound start-up Chirp is partnering with utility company EDF Energy on a project that aims to bring connectivity to areas of power stations that have typically been ‘dead zones’ in industrial IoT terms. 

The project will take place at EDF’s Heysham 1 nuclear power station in Lancashire, UK and has been awarded £100,000 by public-sector innovation agency, Innovate UK. Together, the two companies will use Chirp’s technology, which takes data and encodes it into unique audio streams to provide connectivity in radio-frequency restricted environments.

“WiFi and mobile communications are common in most workplaces, but not on our stations,” explained Dave Stanley, a project manager in EDF Energy’s Innovation Delivery Team. “So having a way of getting regular and reliable data from remote instruments in radio-restricted areas will be useful for our engineers.”

Read more: Start-up of the month: Chirp – turning data into sound to reach network ‘notspots’

Chirping away

Any device with a speaker can transmit a ‘chirp’ and most devices with a microphone can decode it. In the Chirp/EDF project, signals from remote and inaccessible checkpoints on the power station will be transmitted to computer networks as ‘chirps’, enabling workers to monitor instruments from offices and relieving them of the burden of frequent in-person inspections.

This is the second phase of a two-part engagement between Chirp and EDF Energy. The first phase saw the two explore the possibilities of using data-over-sound in nuclear power plants, starting in November 2016 and continuing over the first half of 2017. From this work, a successful proof of concept was delivered to take readings from a gauge.

“The first phase of our engagement with EDF Energy was a resounding success. We were set a serious challenge, to use data-over-sound in a very difficult environment and it passed with flying colours,” said Dr Dan Jones, chief science officer at Chirp.

Phase two, meanwhile, began at the Heysham 1 power plant in October 2017.


Coming soon: Our Internet of Energy event will be taking place in Berlin, Germany on 6 & 7 March 2018. Attendees will hear how companies in this sector are harnessing the power of IoT to transform distributed energy resources. 

Internet of Energy DE

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Internet of Business

How To Regulate Power in Davos? (With IoT!)

The Global Elite are currently converging on the Swiss town of Davos for the 2018 World Economic Forum, and the heavy snow means that there’s already heavy traffic before it even begins.

The forum is traditionally all about power relationships — but in these cold, snowy conditions, a different type of power regulation may come into play, based on the Internet of Things.

The Swiss federal railway (SBB) runs on electricity. In the Global Railway Review and in a recent presentation in Budapest, SBB’s  explained how new technology is pointing the way to greater energy efficiency.

The highest energy use occurs in the winter during the coldest periods during the morning and evening commutes, when many trains all leave at the same time. These sharp peaks typically have a duration of less than one minute, and only occur a few times a year — but these few minutes a year require the supply of an entire additional power band.

By 2030, the SBB expects an average increase in demand for energy of more than 25% — and at peak times even more than 40%. In order to avoid the expensive construction of new power stations in the alps, the organization has implemented the first steps to a railway smart grid by implementing “peak-shaving.” This is when a high-performance IT system identifies peak loads, selects appropriate “thermic consumers” that can be temporarily disabled, and switches them off for just a short period of time.

The “thermic consumers” include rail carriages and the railroad switches (points). The new system uses an in-memory streaming analytics system based on SAP HANA to detect the arrival of peak loads and communicate with the heating systems in the train carriages. Extensive testing has shown that not even the most sensitive passenger would notice the short time the heating is turned off.

There are many benefits to the new system, including postponed investments in new energy infrastructure by leveraging existing assets, savings in peak energy costs, and an increase in the reliability of the energy supply.

And this is just the start for SBB — the organization is already looking to expand this first project into a full power management system, with new opportunities to control other energy-consuming appliances in the future, such as the train engines themselves.

If only political shutdowns could be as easily avoided by the proper regulation of power!

This article originally appeared on Digital Business & Business Analytics.


Internet of Things – Digitalist Magazine