Applying IoT At Airports To Eliminate Passenger Queuing

Applying IoT At Airports To Eliminate Passenger Queuing

Gatwick airport is applying IoT intelligence with a goal to completely remove queuing and improve the passenger experience. MultiTech has expanded its LPWA wireless connectivity offerings, while Raltron Electronics has come up with a new IoT multiband antenna primarily designed for “sub 1GHz applications” such as ZigBee, LoRa, Sigfox, etc.


Applying IoT At Airports To Eliminate Passenger Queuing

Splunk and Gatwick are working together to improve flight capacity and aircraft turnaround time using Splunk’s data analytics platform, Splunk Enterprise. The end goal is to completely remove queuing from the passenger experience. At the moment, Gatwick’s IT systems analyse all passenger movements from check-in to bag drop, through security, into the lounge and onto the plane. The data collected is routed through Splunk to identify performance gains.
Furthermore, the US freight rail industry relies on Splunk software to capture a variety of sensor data right off the rails and analyse it in real time. By listening to the remote sensors (on average 10-12) installed on each freight train, New York Air Brake, a manufacturer of air brake and train control systems, can analyse train performance and fuel efficiency, while ensuring that trains are running to time. Read more.


699 to 2690MHz Multiband Antenna For IoT

Raltron Electronics has announced the ‘PN RST-MB-15388- 22-G- 1’ multiband antenna covering a frequency range from 699MHz to 2690MHz, and featuring a 196x38x13.8mm footprint and a gain of 3dBi. The new antenna has been primarily designed for “sub 1GHz applications” such as ZigBee, LoRa, Sigfox, etc. It could also be efficiently used for other bands: GPS, WiFi/Bluetooth,4G/LTE, etc.


3GPP LTE Cat M1 And NB-IoT Cellular Modems

Multi-Tech Systems has launched its first cellular modems and devices based on LTE Category M1 and NB-IoT technologies. The new modems and devices are targeted at applications ranging from smart cities to energy, utilities, and factory automation, as well as healthcare. Read more.


 

 

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Cincinnati Airport uses Bliptrack to improve passenger wait times

Cincinnati Airport uses Bliptrack to improve passenger wait times

Cincinnati Airport in Kentucky is using connected technology from BlipTrack in a bid to deal with passenger demand and improve wait times.

With almost seven million passengers passing through this international transport hub last year, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG) is using live data to identify delays at the security checkpoint and allocate staff and resources better.

To do this, it’s been using BlipTrack technology from Blip Systems, allowing it to process passengers in more efficient ways. Just last year, the airport achieved its best-ever ranking in its 21-year history in the US Department of Transportation airfare report.

Read more: Billund Airport invests in IoT system to improve passenger experience

Tech pioneer

CVG is always looking to improve, and it’s been using sophisticated technology for years. In 2014, CA implemented BlipTrack queue and flow technology at its checkpoints.

It was the first American airport to implement this technology, which allows staff to measure, understand and improve the traveler experience, and to better plan and allocate crucial resources.

After one year of use, the airport announced that the data gathered had helped it reduced its security line wait times by one third. A 2015 report by Purdue University found that standard wait times had dropped by nearly over four minutes from 13.2 minutes in 2011 to 8.9 minutes.

Read more: New Zealand Air Force recruits Blip Systems for traffic management project

Continuing journey

Since originally enabling this technology, Cincinnati Airport has added new features to the solution to help it continue streamlining operations further and improving the passenger experience.

For instance, it’s now using passenger-facing wait time monitors and CVGairport.com interfaces to provide immediate wait-time status, easing natural travel anxieties associated with queuing for passengers.

In addition, the airport has established what it calls “service level agreement (SLA)-like standards for self-accountability”, helping it to stick to its goal of wait times below 15 minutes. 

Read more: Birmingham Airport uses IoT to monitor queues and keep passengers happy

Boosting efficiencies

Stephen Saunders, senior manager of terminal operations at CVG, explained how the technology works: “We have added a new feature that allows us to understand the pattern of how lanes are being utilized throughout the day.

“This helps us better understand TSA’s lane utilization on any given day. Our future goal is to pair this information with passenger show-up profiles and wait-time inputs to complete a story of how the check point is operating as a whole, and help the TSA develop lane open/close plans based on predicted throughputs.”

He added that the airport, which serves the greater Cincinnati area, has been working with partners to get the most out of this technology. “We have used tangible data to work with our partners at TSA to adjust officer start time,” said Saunders.

“We previously noticed a high spike in queue waits during our heaviest early bank of morning flights, levelling off after about 7:30am. We collectively identified TSA schedules were misaligned with the flight schedules.”

Read more: Smart city of Aarhus uses Bluetooth sensors to improve traffic flows

The future is here

Candace McGraw, CEO at CVG, is a big believer in this innovation.  “Our use of the technology has proven quite successful,” she said.

“It has enabled CVG to continue our close collaboration with TSA to ensure that the passenger experience is one that enhances the journey experience, not detracts from it. Our significant investments in our facilities and the solution ensures we use them as as effectively and efficiently as possible.”

Today, more than 25 airports from around the world are using technology from Bliptrack. They include JFK, San Diego, Copenhagen, Dublin, Oslo, Manchester and Brussels airports.

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Billund Airport invests in IoT system to improve passenger experience

Billund Airport invests in IoT system to improve passenger experience

Billund Airport, Denmark, has installed a passenger flow system from Danish IoT company Blip Systems to improve the airport experience for commuters and holidaymakers.

Previously, Denmark’s second largest airport used the BlipTrack queue measurement system to measure queue and dwell times, and ensure crowds are moving seamlessly.

However, the open platform only covered security processes. Now, Billund has expanded the platform to include information on how passengers move through the airport, providing insights into their behavior during that time. The idea is that management will be able to form a clear, cohesive picture of passenger experiences, from entering the carpark, to departure, and everywhere in between.

The data will be collected in real-time, allowing staff to also make proactive decisions to improve the passenger flow. Billund Airport suggests that it will be able to use the data to encourage passengers to spend more time in the concession areas, for example. Doing so would effectively maximize non-aviation revenue, and minimize the impact of operational changes to the passenger flow, while boosting the passenger experience.

The patterns can also be averaged over a day, a week, a month, as well as a specific time of day, or a specific holiday period, which will enhance the airport’s understanding of how disruptions or changes affect the standard behavior of passengers. In theory, this kind of data could determine the future layout of the airport, and will help staff to identify potential areas of new business.

Credit: Blip Systems

Ultimately, however, the system aims to improve and streamline airport processes, such as check-in, security and immigration.

Read more: Birmingham Airport uses IoT to monitor queues and keep passengers happy

Happy passengers better for business

“The basic requirements for happy passengers are easy parking and check-in, speedy security processing, and comfort while waiting in airport terminals,” said Preben Fugl Andersen, sales manager at Blip Systems. “These factors can make or break a passenger’s airport experience and strongly influence how much money they spend in the concession areas.”

“Handling passenger flow smoothly and efficiently is key to the success of an airport and its image. To understand and improve individual areas of airport operations, it is important to understand that each area influences another and that the passenger’s journey is seen as a single process, rather than as a string of isolated events, and is key to unlocking potential gains.”

Billund Airport joins a host of other airports, including Amsterdam, Auckland and Bristol that are using the platform for passenger flow analytics. BlipTrack is employed in more than 25 airports, including JFK Airport in New York, Copenhagen, Oslo, Geneva, Milano, Birmingham, Brussels, Cincinnati and Keflavik.

Blip Systems’ bluetooth sensor technology is also in use in the Danish city of Aarhus, where it is used to improve the flow of traffic.

Read more: New Zealand Air Force recruits Blip Systems for traffic management project

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Autonomous driving will create $7 trillion “passenger economy”, says Intel

A new “passenger economy”, worth £7 trillion, will be created by fully autonomous vehicles by 2050, according to new research from Intel and Strategy Analytics.

The report, ‘Accelerating the Future: The Economic Impact of the Emerging Passenger Economy’, looks at the economic potential created when today’s active drivers become idle passengers. In other words, when cars drive themselves (at least some of the time), human time and cognitive surplus will be unlocked.

Self-driving vehicles, according to the report, are expected to free more than 250 million hours of commuting time per year in the most congested cities in the world. And that, it adds, has the potential to “reconfigure entire industries”.

Read more: Powervault to give electric car batteries a second life in smart homes

New businesses models

Autonomous vehicles will also open the door to new business models. The report estimates that business use of Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) offerings will generate $ 3 trillion in revenues, or 43 percent of the total passenger economy. Consumer use of MaaS, meanwhile, is expected to account for $ 3.7 trillion in revenue or nearly 55 percent of the total passenger economy.

“Companies should start thinking about their autonomous strategy now,” said Intel CEO Brian Krzanich. “Less than a decade ago, no one was talking about the potential of a soon-to-emerge app or sharing economy, because no one saw it coming.”

“This is why we started the conversation around the Passenger Economy early, to wake people up to the opportunity streams that will emerge when cars become the most powerful mobile data generating devices we use and people swap driving for riding.”

Study co-author Harvey Cohen, president of research company Strategy Analytics said that autonomous technology will drive change across a range of industries and define a new landscape, the first green shoots of which will appear in the business-to-business sector.

“The emergence of pilotless vehicle options will first appear in developed markets and will reinvent the package delivery and long-haul transportation sectors. This will relieve driver shortages around the world and account for two-thirds of initial projected revenues,” he added.

Read more: Trial of driverless shuttle kicks off in Greenwich, London

Life-saving potential?

They also have the power to save lives, apparently: the report claims that self-driving cars will save 585,000 lives in the decade between 2035 and 2045, which it dubs ‘the Passenger Economy Era’. Reductions in public safety costs related to traffic accidents could amount to more than $ 234 billion over that period.

The report goes on to show its workings: it reckons 94 percent of all accidents are due to human error. “If we conservatively assume that just 5 percent of these accidents are avoided in the decade from 2035 to 2045 due to pilotless vehicles, 585,000 lives will be saved during that time,” the report states.

Read more: Driverless cars are coming, despite consumer doubts, says OpenText

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Intel looks at new $7 trillion ‘passenger economy’ through autonomous driving

One of the key questions surrounding connected cars and autonomous driving is around efficiency: will users be able to do more with their free time normally spent behind the wheel? Intel has had a look into the crystal ball, and argues the ‘passenger economy’ opportunity could hit $ 7 trillion (£5.4tn) as the technology becomes mainstream.

“Companies should start thinking about their autonomous strategy now – less than a decade ago, no one was talking about the potential of a soon-to-emerge app or sharing economy because no one saw it coming,” said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO in a statement.

“This is why we started the conversation around the ‘passenger economy’ early, to wake people up to the opportunity streams that will emerge when cars become the most powerful mobile data generating devices we use and people swap driving for riding.”

The study, put together alongside Strategy Analytics and titled ‘Accelerating the Future: The Economic Impact of the Emerging Passenger Economy’, runs through several potential scenarios and examines business use of mobility as a service (MaaS).

Vehicles could become ‘transportation experience pods’, the companies claim, turning cars into anything from touchscreen tables for remote collaboration, to mobile healthcare clinics, to onboard beauty salons. The opportunity also has far reaching implications beyond the vehicle itself. Media and content producers will develop custom content formats for longer and shorter travel, for instance, while location-based advertising will ‘become more keenly relevant’.

An example from the report gives an indication as to the catch-all nature of the opportunity, titled ‘Lunch and a VR Movie’:

“Mr. Jones Sr is heading out for lunch with his friends. Now 85 years old, he notes with satisfaction that his AutoCab’s flexible interior has automatically reconfigured itself to accommodate his power chair. As he boards the vehicle, it informs him that the journey will be leisurely. His friends are running late, and his stored personal preferences are that he would prefer to arrive with everyone else rather than wait at the restaurant on his own.

“The AutoCab reassures him that it has, of course, informed the restaurant of their short delay. Never mind, he thinks – more time for some retro-gaming. He was quite the Half-Life ace back in the day. With the fully re-mastered graphics shown in full 360-degree holo-projection on the now darkened vehicle interior, he settles into his game. He thinks: how did we cope with those clunky VR headsets of 35 years ago?

“A discrete chime from the AutoCab brings him back to reality; he’d forgotten that he’d booked a video consultation with his physician. A few minutes later, he’s a happy man. His cholesterol levels have responded very well to treatment. He will be having dessert today.”

It may sound a bit like the Jetsons, but increasingly this is being cited as the utopian future. Jan van Vonno, speaking at a Red Hat event last year, broke with the usual tradition of stats and slides-heavy presentations from his employer, IDC, and instead looked towards innovation, digital transformation, and open source with similar themes.

The report gazes a reasonable distance into the future, predicting that between 2035 and 2045 reductions to public safety could amount to more than $ 234 billion, while more than half a million (585,000) lives can be saved due to self-driving vehicles.

Intel has been particularly bullish in this sector in recent months. Moves include bolstering the collaboration with BMW and Mobileye by bringing Delphi on board, as well as unveiling an innovation centre for autonomous driving.

Yet one question persists: will there be enough time to relax, or will users be feeling queasy in their autonomous machines? Virtual reality may continue to make strides, but as a research study from  the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) found in 2015, up to 10% of American adults riding in fully self-driving vehicles would be expected to ‘often’, ‘usually’ or ‘always’ experience some level of motion sickness.

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