Oracle IoT Cloud for Industry 4.0 Helps Organizations Make Process Improvements for More Intelligent Supply Chains

Oracle IoT Cloud for Industry 4.0 Helps Organizations Make Process Improvements for More Intelligent Supply Chains

Oracle IoT Cloud for Industry 4.0 Helps Organizations Make Process Improvements for More Intelligent Supply Chains

New Augmented Reality, Machine Vision, Digital Twin and Automated Data Science capabilities enhance production, logistics, warehousing and maintenance.

Empowering modern businesses to improve production intelligence and market responsiveness, Oracle today unveiled new Industry 4.0 capabilities for Oracle Internet of Things (IoT) Cloud.

The advanced monitoring and analytics capabilities of the new offering enables organizations to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and identify new sources of revenue through advanced tracking of assets, workers, and vehicles; real-time issue detection; and predictive analytics.

According to The Economist Intelligence Unit, 63 percent of manufacturers have either undergone substantial digital transformation or are in the process of transforming parts of their organization, and 19 percent are developing transformation strategies. To remain competitive in the modern economy, businesses need to leverage new technologies and data to modernize their supply chains and improve visibility, predictive insights, and automation through connected workflows.

With new augmented reality, machine vision, digital twin and data science capabilities, Oracle IoT Cloud enables organizations to gain rich insight into the performance of assets, machines, workers, and vehicles so they can optimize their supply chain, manufacturing, and logistics, reduce time to market for new products; and enable new business models.

Bhagat Nainani, group vice president, IoT Applications at Oracle, said:

“IoT is the great enabler of Industry 4.0’s potential, providing real-time visibility and responsiveness at every step of the production process – from raw materials to customer fulfillment.”

“Oracle empowers organizations to create smart factories and modern supply chains with seamless interaction models between business applications and physical equipment. By receiving real-time data streams enhanced with predictive insights, our IoT applications provide intelligent business processes that deliver quick ROI.”

Today’s expansion follows the recent announcement of artificial Intelligence, digital thread and digital twin for supply chain, as well as industry-specific solutions for Oracle IoT Cloud. Oracle IoT Cloud is offered both as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications, as well as Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) offerings, enabling a high degree of adaptability for even the most demanding implementations.

Scott Rogers, technical director at Noble Plastics, said:

“We plan to leverage Oracle IoT Cloud and its machine learning capabilities to automatically analyze information gathered from the robot and process-monitoring systems. These analytics could help Noble identify ways to reduce cycle time, improve the manufacturing process, enhance product quality, and cut downtime.”

Oracle plans to add the new capabilities across the entire range of IoT Cloud Applications – Asset Monitoring, Production Monitoring, Fleet Monitoring, Connected Worker, and Service Monitoring for Connected Assets:

  • Digital Twin: Enables remote users to monitor the health of assets and prevent failures before they occur, as well as running simulations of “what-if” scenarios in the context of the business processes. With Digital Twin, organizations have a new operational paradigm to interact with the physical world, allowing lower operational and capital expenditures, minimizing downtime, and optimizing asset performance.
  • Augmented Reality: Gives operators and plant managers the ability to view operational metrics and related equipment information in the context of the physical asset for faster troubleshooting and assisted maintenance. In addition, the use of AR in training technicians reduces errors and on-boarding time, and improves user productivity.
  • Machine Vision: Provides detailed non-intrusive visual inspections, which can detect defects invisible to the naked eye, at high speed and scale. Following the rapid inspection, Machine Vision sets in motion appropriate corrective actions when anomalies and errors are spotted.
  • Auto Data Science: Automated business-specific data science and artificial intelligence algorithms continuously analyze asset utilization, production yield and quantity, inventory, fleet performance, as well as worker safety concerns, to predict issues before they arise. Auto Data Science features enable users to see performance metrics of each step in the modern supply chain with the ability to drill down into specific issues at each location without employing an army of data scientists.

Oracle IoT Cloud enables companies to monitor capital intensive assets to reduce downtime and servicing costs, and track utilization for accurate lifecycle insights and asset depreciation data, which improves enterprise procurement efficiency. The rich pool of data created by sensors within products enables organizations to offer their products as a service, gain insight into how customers are using their products, and offer improved value-added services that drive new sources of revenue.

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IoT Business News

With a single focus, Intel’s Vaunt has more potential than Google Glass

Back in October of 2013, I got my own pair of Google Glass in order to cover the technology. The site where I worked at the time paid the $ 1,500 cost, and I later spent my own $ 225 to add custom frames that could handle my eyeglass prescription. Given the fate of Glass, we clearly didn’t get a good return on those investments.

Still, there were some things to like about the experience. Glass brought contextual information “closer” to me a relatively non-intrusive way. And that’s exactly what Intel’s smart glasses prototype, known as Vaunt, can do.

When I first read about Vaunt over at The Verge earlier this week, I thought less about the hardware and more about that vision of context and personally important data. That’s because all of our technological advances in mobile computing have impacted this theme.

I look at it this way:

  • In the desktop age, the web brought us closer to data on other computers.
  • Connected laptops brought us closer to data when away from the desktop.
  • Phones put that data in our hand and pocket almost wherever we were.
  • Smartwatches let us wear that data, bringing it even closer
  • Smart glasses can beam that data — at least in the case of Vaunt — directly on our retinas.

Every step of that progression gets us physically closer to contextual information. I suppose the next, or maybe final, step is a Matrix-like jack that simply ports that data directly into our brains, but who knows? Regardless, this is an important theme as more devices around us create gobs of data. The fewer barriers there are between us and the information we want, the faster we can use or act upon it.

And that’s why I’m excited about Vaunt’s potential, perhaps more so than I was about that of Google Glass.

To contrast the two at a high level, Vaunt isn’t trying to take smartphone functions — such as taking photos and videos, a key reason Glass never had a chance of mainstream success — and move them to your eyes. Instead, the product is singularly focused on very specific information that you will want at a specific time and/or place.

That approach has benefits from a hardware perspective too. t’s why you essentially can’t tell the difference between Vaunt and a traditional pair of glasses. They appear to be standard eyeglass frames to both you and the people around you.

Without the need to include a camera sensor, microphone or speaker, the small chips and display components fit inside the frames. Eliminating the camera also allows for a smaller battery since powering an image sensor typically uses a lot of energy. Using a low-powered, single color laser for the retina projection helps with battery life too when compared to the color display used in Google Glass.

By distilling potential product features into essentially one — simple but very useful information — Vaunt actually solves a problem; something Glass sort of did but other extra features came along for the distracting ride. In fact, I don’t see much of a distraction factor with Vaunt because they don’t look like some technological device nor will people even realize that your retina is receiving information.

Clearly, this doesn’t mean Vaunt will be successful. In fact, Intel isn’t even sure of how Vaunt will be used. That’s why the company will be launching an early access program for developers at some point this year. Intel is just providing the technology while developers will provide the functions that they think people will want.

Think of Vaunt then as a new hardware platform with a very limited feature set. That feature is very powerful though: It takes us one step even closer to the information that personally matters most to us..

Stacey on IoT | Internet of Things news and analysis

Google assimilates Nest once more

Saying goodbye must have been too hard for Google as the company is bringing Nest back under its roof.

Nest was co-founded by former Apple engineers in 2010. Google bought the young startup, whose innovative thermostat became one of the first successful smart home devices, for $ 3.2 billion (£2.3bn) back in 2014.

Following a major restructuring — when Google’s umbrella company, Alphabet, was created — Nest was spun off into a separate company. Alphabet is now folding Nest back into Google as the company attempts to fight off increasing competition from Amazon.

Rick Osterloh, Senior Vice President of Hardware at Google, says:

“We're excited to bring the Nest and Google Hardware teams together. The goal is to supercharge Nest’s mission: to create a more thoughtful home, one that takes care of the people inside it and the world around it.

By working together, we’ll continue to combine hardware, software and services to create a home that’s safer, friendlier to the environment, smarter and even helps you save money—built with Google’s artificial intelligence and the Assistant at the core.”

Google sees the IoT and smart homes as a major source of growth in the coming years. The company has put significant resources into building its AI and launching a range of smart home devices.

Amazon’s competitor, the Echo line, has been commercially more successful than Google’s — in part due to the company’s retail influence. However, according to survey-based data from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP), it appears Google Home has gained some ground on Amazon’s devices.

The competition is increasing for Google and not just from Amazon. Apple joins the fray, as of today, with its HomePod. Later this year, Microsoft, Samsung and Facebook will also be entering the market.

In advance of their entries, Google is bolstering its in-house manufacturing capabilities. Last week, Alphabet's Google unit announced it had paid $ 1.1bn to buy a large chunk of HTC's hardware operations — gaining the company around 2,000 engineers in Asia.

Do you think bringing Nest back into Google is a good idea? Let us know in the comments.

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5 Months After the Hurricanes, the World Must Do More to Reconnect the Caribbean

2017 was one of the most active hurricane seasons in the Caribbean on record. Five months after the major storms Irma and Marie devastated parts of the Caribbean, there are still far too many people without access to the Internet and everything it offers. In our view, this is unacceptable. Today we published a snapshot of the current situation from the region in a new document, Report from the Field: Post-Hurricane Connectivity in the Caribbean.

The international response to this natural disaster has been mixed at best, and while several entities reached out to the region, a number of challenges impeded smooth and rapid assistance, such as lack of coordination. In some instances, the response from authorities has been either slow or insufficient, or both. The current reality that parts of the Caribbean are still without Internet connectivity this long after the hurricanes wrought their damage is a clear indication that the world’s response to this disaster has fallen short. The robustness of the telecommunications’ infrastructures in certain countries, which form the basis for Internet services, can also be questioned.

The world has the resources to do more.

We ask governments, businesses, educational institutions, NGOs and others, both in the region and around the world, to join together with renewed determination and commitment to reconnect the Caribbean – and to build a more resilient infrastructure that will help the region recover more quickly from the next round of hurricanes.

We believe that the reaction from governments should not be limited by political differences or formal barriers. People’s lives, pains and opportunities demand immediate action and all actors must work together to ensure that the response in future cases is timely and appropriate. It is simply unacceptable that so many people are still without both Internet access and electricity. It’s time to refocus and reaffirm our collective commitment to the Caribbean region.

The Internet Society will lead by example by doing the following:

  1. Partnering with entities that are looking how to enhance telecommunications and internet infrastructure resiliency. As part of this the Internet Society has been accepted as a member of the Commission for Caribbean Network Resilience charted by the CTU. Based on my telecom and Internet policy expertise, I will be joining as our representative.
  2. Partnering with Caribbean organizations focused on telecom infrastructure. In particular we look forward to working with CANTO’s Natural Disaster Committee.
  3. Developing a Disaster Relief Fund as part of our Beyond The Net funding program. This new program will enable Internet Society Chapters in affected regions after a natural disaster to apply for funds for projects that restore Internet connectivity. We will be announcing more information during the weeks ahead.
  4. Engaging our community in this effort. We will ask our Chapters, Organizational Members and individual members to join with us to make this a reality.

I will be attending the CANTO Annual General Meeting next week (4-6 February 2018) in Trinidad & Tobago where I look forward to discussing these ideas with many attendees.

At the Internet Society, we believe that the economic, social, education and communication opportunities made possible by the Internet are critical to our society today. We believe that Internet outages, either by natural disasters or government shutdowns, harm the people in the region and connectivity must be restored as soon as possible. Beyond that, Internet infrastructure must be made as resilient as possible to stand up as much as possible to these kinds of events.

We look forward to working with our members and partners to bring about a reconnected and more resilient Caribbean region. We are planning several activities over the next few months and will be posting updates and more information to this page:

https://www.internetsociety.org/reconnect-the-caribbean/

Please do share our new report and do all you can to help #ReconnectTheCaribbean.


Image credit:  © Commonwealth Secretariat on Flickr – CC BY-NC 2.0

The post 5 Months After the Hurricanes, the World Must Do More to Reconnect the Caribbean appeared first on Internet Society.

Internet Society

Your Data Is Worth More Than You Think

Data has become a key input for driving growth, enabling businesses to differentiate themselves and maintain a competitive edge. Given the growing importance of data to companies, should managers measure its value? Is it even possible for a company to effectively measure the value of its data? An increasing number of institutions, academics, and business leaders have begun tackling these questions, leaving managers with many alternatives for assessing the value of data. None are yet generally accepted, nor completely satisfactory, but they can help organizations realize more value from their data.

Why Is Data Valuation Important?

There are three basic reasons organizations want a good way to understand the value of their data. A good sense of value can help guide good decisions around direct monetization, internal investments, and mergers and acquisitions.

Direct Data Monetization

Many organizations are keen to monetize data directly by selling it to third parties or marketing data products. Inability to understand data’s value can result in mispriced products. Understanding the impact of exposing data to third parties on the value of a company’s data for indirect monetization can help guide the decision on whether to pursue explicit monetization. Today, despite an increasing recognition of potential benefit, most organizations are very conservative about what data they expose outside the enterprise. Good valuation approaches could help leaders understand if selling their data would really affect their competitive position or ability to realize their own benefit from it.

Internal Investment

Understanding the value of both current and potential data can help prioritize and direct your investments in data and systems. In our experience, most organizations struggle to articulate the relationship between their IT investments and business value generally. For data systems, the problem is particularly acute. Surveys report that only about 30% to 50% of data warehousing projects are successful at delivering value. Understanding how data drives business value can help you understand where you should be minimizing costs, and where you should be investing to realize potential ROI.

An ability to articulate data’s contribution to an organization’s overall value can transform the relationship between technology and business management. Chief experience officers (CXOs) charged with managing data report that their ability to articulate business value from data investments with rigor supported by the CFO results in more resources available to drive more positive outcomes for their organizations.

Mergers & Acquisitions

Inaccurate valuing of data assets can be costly to shareholders during mergers and acquisitions (M&A). Steve Todd, an EMC fellow, argues that data valuations can be used both to negotiate better terms for initial public offerings, M&As, and bankruptcy, and to improve transparency and communication with shareholders. Did Microsoft Corp.’s purchase price of LinkedIn Corp. include the value of LinkedIn’s data about professionals and companies? Did they survey potential uses of data in the combined company? The assumption that data’s value is captured only by sales and revenue figures may understate the overall value of a transaction to the benefit of the buyer — and to the detriment of the seller.

Current generally accepted accounting practices (GAAP) do not permit data to be capitalized on the balance sheet. This leads to considerable disparity between book value and market value of these companies, and a possible mispricing of valuation premiums. While internationally agreed-upon standards may emerge in the next five years, the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), the global professional accounting organization, is encouraging accounting companies to come forward with approaches. Wilson and Stenson provide an excellent review of accounting approaches that recognize and value intangible assets in general, and information assets in particular.

Existing Approaches Are Useful, But Limited

Methods for valuing data are varied. Most descend from existing asset valuation or information theory. Some attempt to attribute the value of business outcomes directly to data-driven capabilities. Like statistical models, all have limitations, but some are useful.

Dell EMC Global Services Chief Technology Officer Schmarzo developed the so-called “prudent value” approach, which values data sets based on the extent to which they could be used to advance key business initiatives that support an organization’s overall business strategy. This approach has two main advantages:

  • It provides ballpark valuation (or a range of values) for the data set derived from the financial value of the business initiative.
  • More important, it frames the data valuation process around the business decisions that need to be made to drive the targeted business initiative. It quantifies the ways in which different data sets might be utilized and the impact this could have on the success of the targeted business initiative.

Mapping data to valuable outcomes can fulfill many purposes of data valuation. It supports rigorous ROI arguments based on concrete business outcomes for IT investment decisions. It can also guide pricing direct monetization efforts by relating the business value of the decisions third parties use with respect to data to guide the price they might pay for access.

Some of the most comprehensive work on the subject of data valuation comes from Gartner Inc.’s Douglas Laney. Laney, vice president and distinguished analyst, Chief Data Officer Research, proposes “infonomics” as an economic discipline, arguing that information should be treated as an actual corporate asset — measured, managed, and deployed as if it were a traditional asset. Laney describes six different information valuation methods, three foundational and three financial.

The foundational methods are primarily aimed at businesses that wish to prioritize or create an aggregate of data quality characteristics to get a sense of what its relative or intrinsic value is. These methods force businesses to take stock of their data, how they are leveraging it (or not!), and ultimately articulate its value and evaluate what is and isn’t useful. Laney’s financial measures draw on methods to value intangible assets.

The biggest limitation of Laney’s approach is that it does not tie the value of information to its role in supporting business decisions. His approach is more likely to be useful for valuing data in M&A transactions.

Where to Start

While there is still room for significant improvement in how to value data, current methods can still be useful to enterprises. Organizations should begin efforts to:

  • Create management consensus on how to build business cases for IT investments in data, infrastructure, and capabilities.
  • Use data valuation to prioritize data investments.
  • Begin cataloging and estimating value from existing and potential data-driven capabilities to inform valuation on the public markets or in M&A transactions.

Organizations that become more capable of getting value from data will certainly realize benefits and competitive advantage. Developing the ability to understand data’s value, and contribution to outcomes, is an important part of delivering that value.


MIT Sloan Management Review