IDEMIA and Arkessa Partner on eUICC to Drive Growth in Industrial and Enterprise IoT

IDEMIA and Arkessa Partner on eUICC to Drive Growth in Industrial and Enterprise IoT

IDEMIA and Arkessa Partner on eUICC to Drive Growth in Industrial and Enterprise IoT

IDEMIA, the global leader in Augmented Identity for an increasingly digital world, and Arkessa, a leading M2M/IoT connectivity service provider, have today announced the extension of their partnership to deliver eUICC and Subscription Management services to global Enterprise and Industrial IoT customers.

Arkessa’s connectivity management services include a global cellular footprint built on international roaming and local network integrations with the leading mobile network operators (MNOs) reducing barriers for IoT.

The platform now includes IDEMIA eUICC and subscription management services and brings consistency and reliability to the installation process and operational performance. The ability to switch or localise SIM profiles without the burden of recalling or visiting devices gives Enterprise IoT customers greater freedom to customise according to business needs, technical or commercial.

This freedom, combined with a range of radio technology choices from 2G, 3G, 4G, NB-IoT, LTE Cat M to 5G, is accelerating Cellular IoT adoption on a global scale. The combined capability of Arkessa and IDEMIA will simplify and reduce the barriers for large scale Enterprise IoT deployment.

The eUICC based solution is transforming how OEMs design and deploy enterprise-grade IoT solutions. OEMs in all sectors most notably in the Automotive, Consumer and Household appliance markets, can now build global connectivity into their products which enable a superior user-experience resembling what is usually only seen with premium smart-phone or e-reader devices. IoT devices do not typically have screens making the network services the critical components in delivering a zero-touch provisioning and operational experience.

Yves Portalier, Executive Vice-President for Connected objects activities at IDEMIA declares:

“Arkessa’s multi-network MVNO platform coupled with IDEMIA’s eUICC and Subscription Management services mean that we can deliver future-proofed and secure connectivity solutions globally and for all types of IoT businesses.”

“We appreciate Arkessa’s leading go-to-market position thanks to their strong international channel partnerships.”

Andrew Orrock, CEO at Arkessa says: “We are excited to extend our partnership with IDEMIA and take a leadership position in Enterprise IoT solutions and services. The control, flexibility and global reach of eUICC is having a profound impact on IoT businesses and we see an astonishing opportunity pipeline across the whole range of sectors that Arkessa serves. Healthcare, automotive, robotics, household and office appliances, drones, retail and vending are all strong examples.”

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Don’t dream big when taking on industrial or enterprise IoT

As inspiring as the phrase business transformation is, I’ve decided that when it comes to industrial or enterprise IoT, it’s better to start small. Most executives by now are well aware that you should begin with a use case, but what’s become more clear as time has passed and projects have failed is that maybe business transformation shouldn’t be your first goal.

Peter Zornio, chief technology officer at ‎Emerson Automation Solutions, says that in his experience, the operations guys in building systems or in a plant want a use case and an ROI, while the IT shops tend to want to install a platform so folks in the business can build their own applications on top of it.

“Tangible ROIs that are easy to see are great,” Zornio says. “Operational guys love that because they have to justify their spend, while the IT guys want to think big. These are the guys that 15 years ago convinced everyone to spend hundreds of millions on ERP systems.”

Zornio isn’t bashing ERP systems, but if you ask ERP buyers if that money was well spent, many of them wouldn’t really know. Which is why Zornio is a big fan of metrics when discussing IoT projects.

He’s not alone. Jason Shepherd, a senior director and IoT CTO at Dell, says, “Too many IoT projects start as science projects (e.g., “Wouldn’t that be neat?”) with no clear metrics for success.” You know what’s really hard to measure? Business transformation.

So if measurement is the key, how should you think about that? In some situations, a use case and the subsequent savings are crystal clear. For example, if you automate data collection that normally requires an employee, calculating the savings is easy.

But Zornio says other use cases, such as ensuring reliability, are more difficult. First you have to come up with the number of times a particular part or machine fails, then you need to figure out the cost to the production process or the team. You also have to factor in the cost and time it takes to make those repairs. Replacing a part that is commonly in inventory vs. replacing something that might have to be ordered will factor into those costs.

Those kinds of calculations are more subjective than calculating the cost of replacing a worker. You could debate how often equipment fails. Or how much it costs when it does fail, depending on what a company values. For example, downtime in one part of the plant might be relatively unimportant because there’s a backup or low demand during certain times of the year. So it’s always better to search for the obvious. Sometimes, the flamingly obvious.

“We had a customer come to us about monitoring pumps. There, the risk wasn’t downtime, but that when one of the pumps failed it tended to catch on fire,” says Zornio. “In that case, the ROI wasn’t about money saved as much as it was about deciding how valuable it was to the organization to avoid fires in their factory.” (That entire conversation has me thinking that an enterprising IoT systems integrator should scour the trade press for industrial disasters to find their next sales prospect.)

Assessing IoT projects’ value isn’t just useful for the companies buying into connected sensors or products. It’s also important for companies trying to build solutions for industrial and enterprise IoT.

That platform mentality is a common one in Silicon Valley, but it’s hard to sell. Especially if you need a deep understanding of specific industry data around costs and functioning of equipment. That’s why many of the big companies are teaming up with those in specialized verticals to pitch their platforms or services.

But again, it appears that success today is found most often in the smaller projects as opposed to the business transformations. Shepherd advises that when choosing a project to ensure that the use case is relatively straightforward so the company can get a “quick win.”

 “A quick win can grow into more advanced benefits, but don’t try and start with too much. For example, start with basic monitoring for visibility and then add analytics,”  he says.

We’ll talk more about what this means in future issues of the newsletter along with the challenges associated with making sure that your employees don’t sabotage your business goals—or the eventual business transformation itself.

Stacey on IoT | Internet of Things news and analysis

IoT Now listed in world’s Top 20 Industrial IoT blogs by ORBCOMM

IoT Now has been listed today in ORBCOMM‘s Top 20 Industrial IoT Blogs. As Internet of Things (IoT) technology continues to evolve and new innovations are born, there are innumerable bloggers reporting on the latest trends in the industrial IoT landscape.

There are far too many good IoT resources to list, says ORBCOMM, so its executives have compiled a list for their internal teams and their partners of 20 “must-bookmark sites” for anyone trying to stay up to speed on the latest developments in industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).

Describing IoT Now, ORBCOMM says, “If you’re interested in learning about what the future of IoT looks like, IoT Now is a great place to go. Yes, it focuses on current innovations and modern-day trends in the IoT landscape, but it provides a window with a clearer view of what the future looks like by examining how we utilise these technologies today. Expect a wide variety of topics, covering everything from microservices to AI and product trends,” says ORBCOMM. (https://www.iot-now.com/blogs/)

Articles have been chosen for their “insightful and up-to-date news regarding the IoT Industry”. ORBCOMM adds that readers “would be interested in seeing what other blogs made the cut,” and it helps to build the overall Industrial IoT community.

The 20 blogs are all valued equally, an ORBCOMM spokesman tells IoT Now. “All (are) even in our eyes. We wanted to list the top blogs/news sources that we read to keep ourselves updated with the industry and share them with our customers. The ones listed are all read equally and we felt they all deserved a spot on our customers’ reading list.”

For the full article go to:
https://blog.orbcomm.com/20-industrial-iot-blogs-bookmark-today/

 

 

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

 

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Blogs – IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business

Industrial IoT initiative to improve Efficiency and Safety in the Rail Industry

Global demand in the transportation sector continues to outpace supply and is recognized as a key area for economic growth. Leveraging Penteon’s electronic sensor development, telecommunications gateway infrastructure and enterprise cloud expertise, the Industrial IoT initiative will open a new era in low-cost, highly-secure rail sector services.

Penteon Corporation has announced a new Industrial IoT initiative to develop custom industrial sensing solutions for locomotives, rail cars and track-side equipment in partnership with Wabtec Corporation. Aging rail systems and lack of real-time data collection have become limiting factors in addressing this increasing demand. Embracing new technologies to acquire and analyze information across their operations and using that information to become more efficient and effective will deliver a more responsive and agile operating environment to rail operators.

The solutions planned for development by Penteon and Wabtec include data collection from rail equipment and systems to develop a real-time, holistic view on the health and status of locomotives, rail cars, and track-side systems. This IIoT project capitalizes on the more than 25 years of remote sensing engineering within Penteon and will deliver cost effective, secure and efficient solutions leveraging Penteon’s unique “Sensing as a Service” business model.

“Penteon’s new, low-power, long-range wireless network, which it is building in partnership with Landmark Infrastructure Partners, will also play a key role in delivering reliable cost-effective services,” said Clay Perreault, Chief Executive Officer of Penteon. “Our work with Wabtec is a truly collaborative, consultative relationship, which involves dedication from both parties.  By working side-by-side with our customers, we’re able to drive the best outcomes at an accelerated pace.”    Read more…

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Internet Of Things | IoT India

Petasense bets on hardware over algorithms for industrial IoT

Petasense co-founders Abhinav Khushraj (left) and Arun Santhebennur (right). Image courtesy of Petasense.

Since this week’s theme so far is data, let’s keep it going with a profile on Petasense, a startup that offers predictive analytics to industrial clients. Petasense was formed in 2014 with a plan to stop downtime at factories by improving plant owners’ ability to understand when their machines would fail. It built a Wi-Fi-connected vibration sensor that collects data from each machine and sends it up to the cloud for analysis.

The resulting data gets sent back in the form of a health score to plant operators. What Petasense founders discovered was that downtime isn’t why companies were interested in the service. Instead, they wanted to use it to avoid scheduled maintenance on equipment that didn’t actually need it. Now plant operators have the ability to set a customized maintenance schedule for each machine, avoiding the downtime and cost that comes with servicing a machine that doesn’t yet need it.

What Petasense is doing isn’t new. GE has been touting its ability to take in data to predict failures for the last five or six years. Startups such as Augury also offer similar services, albeit by analyzing the sounds that machines make as opposed to their direct vibration. Really, the sense is that anyone with a fancy algorithm and access to data can come up with some way to predict the health of a given machine.

But Abhinav Khushraj, one of Petasense’s cofounders, begs to differ. He says that Petasense is different because fancy algorithms are one thing, but access to data is the essential thing. Petasense built its own vibration sensor so it could get clean data to populate its analytics efforts. Controlling the sensor gives Petasense the competitive edge, says Khushraj.

I want to believe this. I can see the value in having clean data and the ability to understand the specifics of the hardware collecting that data. However, I also know that new ways of getting data come along all the time with different incentives to use them. Petasense does make it incredibly easy to buy and deploy its vibration sensor, which goes a long way to assuaging my doubts about its customers finding a new source of vibration data.

The sensor costs between $ 400 and $ 600 and gets glued onto the equipment with industrial epoxy. The battery lasts two years and transmits data every three hours. If it’s as simple as getting someone to walk around sticking a sensor onto every piece of equipment, then that’s not a difficult ask. This assumes it’s easy to put the device on a corporate network. Because it uses Wi-Fi, things could get tricky.

Once the sensor is transmitting data, companies pay about $ 10 per month, per device, for the analytics. The whole service replaces what was typically one person, who would come around and collect vibration data from gear every month or so, and the specialist that person sent the data to, who would then use that reading to see if there was a problem.

Obviously the sensor replaces those two people, but it also collects a lot more information than was previously possible, which presumably leads to better results. Petasense has customers in the utilities industry and customers who use it to monitor HVAC equipment in buildings.

Stacey on IoT | Internet of Things news and analysis