The IoT Tech Expo Global will launch new conference agenda for 2018

The World’s Leading IoT Event Series will bring together key industries from across the globe for 2 days of top level content and discussion. Exploring the latest innovations within the Internet of Things and covering the impact it has on many industries including Manufacturing, Transport, Supply Chain, Insurance, Logistics, Government, Energy and Automotive, this conference is not to be missed. The IoT Tech Expo World Series 2018 will host events in London, Amsterdam and Silicon Valley.

The 2018 World Series is set to welcome 32,000 attendees, 1000+ industry leading speakers and 900+ exhibitors so you can explore the IoT ecosystem and experience the latest technologies first hand. This year’s agenda will highlight the most innovative advancements in technologies which are affecting IoT. There will be case studies and dedicated tracks covering the entire Internet of Things ecosystem.

The third annual Global event will host 2 co-located events covering Blockchain and AI, with 12,000 attendees expected to attend including CTO’s, Heads of Innovation and Technology, IT Directors, Developers & Start-Up’s, OEM’s, Government, Automotive, Operators, Technology Providers, Investors, VCs and many more

Kicking off the 2018 series is the Global event which will return to London in April with the larger venue hall; the Olympia National. The third annual Global event will host 2 co-located events covering Blockchain and AI, with 12,000 attendees expected to attend including CTO’s, Heads of Innovation and Technology, IT Directors, Developers & Start-Up’s, OEM’s, Government, Automotive, Operators, Technology Providers, Investors, VCs and many more.

There will be 8 conference tracks over the two days covering the entire ecosystem:

– Developing for the IoT: Hardware, Platforms, Cloud, Testing, Interoperability, Connectivity

– Connected Transportation: Smart Transportation Infrastructure, Urban Mobility, Smart Maritime & Air Transportation, Connected Vehicles

– Data Analytics for AI & IoT: Big Data, Edge Processing, Data Analytics for Sport, Predictive Analytics, Data Architecture

– Connected Industry: Smart Buildings & Factories, Smart Machinery, Smart Manufacturing

– Connected Enterprise: Smart Supply Chain, Smart Asset Management, Smart Trade

– Smart Energy & Cities: Smart Metering, Smart Grids, Renewable Energy, Managing Energy Usage, Smart Cities

– IoT Technologies & Innovations: Funding, IoT Start-Ups, Monetisation & Business Models, IoT Innovations

– Privacy & SecurityData Protection, Legal Considerations, ID Management, Penetration Testing

You can view the full agenda at a glance here.

There are a range of tickets available from free passes to all-access conference and networking passes.

You can find out more about the World Series 2018 and register for each event here:

IoT Tech Expo Global – 18-19 April – Olympia London

IoT Tech Expo Europe – 27-28 June – RAI Amsterdam

IoT Tech Expo North America – 28-29 November – Santa Clara, Silicon Valley

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IoT Tech Expo North America 2017: Highlights from the event in Silicon Valley

The North America 2017 event welcomes 10,500+ attendees to Silicon Valley!

Firstly, we’d like to thank all those who attended the IoT Tech Expo North America 2017 which returned to the Santa Clara Convention Center, CA for the final leg of the 2017 world series with an extended agenda, larger expo, brand new topics and two co-located events covering Blockchain and AI. The event attracted an audience of 10,500+ attendees with delegates from across North America and beyond to discuss the potential of IoT, Blockchain and AI across a number of industries, with top-level speakers sharing their expertise and experiences on the subject. We hope you found the event beneficial and made some new connections.

We would also like to say a huge thank you to our sponsors, speakers and exhibitors for their involvement in the event and for making it a fascinating and diverse two days.

The two-day event hosted 15 conference tracks, an exhibition, AI start-up incubator, IoT meetup and an evening of networking. On the first day speakers including NASA, Halliburton, Boeing, Bluetooth, Cisco, State of Nevada, Ford, Schneider Electric and many more took to the stage to explore IIoT, manufacturing,  connectivity, smart factories, data privacy, interoperability, security, and more.

Day 2 welcomed the new conference tracks ‘Smart Transportation & Cities’ and ‘IoT in Enterprise’ with speakers from Thyssenkrupp, Shell, Federal Trade Commission, Visa, State of Utah, Toyota, Aviva, Compare, Seattle Reign FC and more sharing their knowledge and experiences across a range of industries and verticals.

Here are a few pictures of the show and you can share yours with us using @IoTTechExpo

If you missed the event, you can catch up on all the sessions by purchasing a Sessions Material Pass which allows you to download all the presentations and recordings from over the two days. These will be available before December 7th and paid pass holders will be emailed their log-in details.

You can also let us know what you think via this short survey, and be entered into a draw to enter 2 x Ultimate Passes to a future event of your choice.

The IoT Tech Expo World Series will be returning in 2018 with shows taking place in London, Amsterdam and Silicon Valley. You can find out more and register for each below:

IoT Tech Expo Global – 18- 19 April 2018, Olympia London

IoT Tech Expo Europe – 1- 2 October 2018, RAI Amsterdam

IoT Tech Expo North America – 28- 29 November 2018, Santa Clara, Silicon Valley

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IoT Tech Expo Europe 2017: Highlights from the two day event in Berlin

Firstly, we’d like to thank all those who attended the IoT Tech Expo Europe 2017 which returned to Berlin at a new venue with an extended agenda, larger expo, brand new topics and two co-located events covering Blockchain and AI. The event attracted an audience of over 4,000 attendees with delegates from across Europe and beyond. We hope you found the event beneficial and made some new connections.

We would also like to say a huge thank you to our sponsors, speakers and exhibitors for their involvement in the event and for making it a fascinating and diverse two days.

The two-day event hosted 2 co located events, 10 conference tracks, an exhibition, start-up incubator, IoT meetup and an evening of networking. On the first day speakers including Sigfox, T-Systems, Nestlé, Volvo CE, Daimler, Santander and Johnson Controls took to the stage to explore Industry 4.0, process automation & predictive maintenance, blockchain, the future of IoT development, creating a seamless smart building ecosystem, IoT 2022 and more.

Day 2 welcomed the new conference tracks ‘Smart Transportation & Cities’ and ‘IoT in Enterprise’ with speakers from Microsoft, Deutsche Bahn, Coca-Cola, Hamburg Sud, John Deere, BMW, Turkish Airlines, City of Tampere, Nice, Graz, European Space Agency, GSK, Allianz and more sharing their knowledge and experiences across a range of industries and verticals.

Here are a few pictures of the show and you can share yours with us using the hashtag #IoTTechExpo

We have upcoming IoT Tech Expo’s in Silicon Valley and you can view further details for each here:

IoT Tech Expo North America – 29-30th November, Santa Clara, Silicon Valley

IoT Tech Expo Global – 18-19th April, Olympia London

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IoT Tech Expo: Building sustainable transport solutions

Anyone who travels in a major city will be aware the increasing number of vehicles on the road is unsustainable from both a practical and environmental point of view. Jeremy Dalton, CTO of TravelSpiritprovided some insight on how we can build sustainable transport solutions for smart cities during a session at the IoT Tech Expo. 

The length of the average commute is on the rise. While other factors also contribute, the increasing amounts of traffic in most cities have a large part to play. As seen in the research below, the daily commute is now up to 40 percent longer in some areas in 2013 than it was in 2005. 

Using the example of Brighton, if we multiply the average increased daily commute time of 19 minutes by the average 235 working days of a full-time employee, we find each worker now spends an extra 74 hours per year just getting to and from work. That’s over three days worth of lost time. Multiply that again by Brighton’s 87,000 full-time workers (according to 2015 census) and we reach a staggering 6,483,000 lost hours per year across Brighton’s population. 

Aside from the impact which inefficient transportation is having on the amount of time we have for work and personal activities each year, emissions from burning fossil fuels are causing havoc with our environment. Despite where you stand on climate change, there’s no denying the effect pollutants are having on global health while the rate we’re depleting fuels is also unsustainable. 

While it will take continued advancements in renewable energy for us to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, smart cities provide an opportunity for us to build more sustainable and efficient transport systems which can get us to our destinations both quicker and healthier. 

Enter yet another ‘as-a-Service’ known as MaaS, or Mobility-as-a-Service. At its core, it’s the idea we’ll move from ownership of vehicles towards shared use and in doing so we open up a range of more efficient transportation methods. 

Those who can afford the high-tech self-driving vehicles we’ll see emerge over the next decade can have them pick up others and earn money for the owner when they’re not in use. “Instead of our cars being idle 80% of the day, now they’re going to be out there working for us,” explains Dalton. 

This will mean fewer cars on the road and less sat idle for most of the day when they could be assisting others with getting around. In fact, MIT put out a report (PDF) which concluded autonomous cars will reduce overall vehicle count by 80 percent. The caveat with their predictions is that it’s based on vehicles being deployed in fleets as public transport to get people out from their private ownership model. “In the end what is exciting, I think, is you’re going to have fewer cars on the road,” said Carlos Ratti, director of the SENSEable City Lab run by MIT.

MaaS will also enable new models of transport monetisation; such as unlimited travel using a driverless service for a monthly fee. Beyond city-level, regional, or even nationwide transport, your subscription could even allow you to access transportation in other countries when you travel for work or leisure. 

“A lot of people think smart mobility is just self-driving cars, generally it comes down to one of three things,” says Dalton. “First is smart parking, this is a really big topic in a lot of cities. Fewer cars circling around looking for spaces means less congestion, and less congestion means better air quality.” 

Startups capitalising on smart parking include Parkanizer and Save-a-Space, along with EU-backed initiatives promoting developments such as frontierCities and FIWARE. The apps, currently in limited tests, enable drivers to see available parking spaces and book them ahead of time as well as report back automatically when they leave and their space is now vacant for others.  

“Another one is signals. Whether that’s V2I (Vehicle-to-Infrastructure) stuff where you’re giving priority to cars coming along like autonomous cars, or electric vehicles, or whatever else you’re trying to promote,” continues Dalton. 

This will help those night-time drives when you’re sat at a traffic light with nothing else around just because it’s on a set timer. Your vehicle will be able to communicate with the light to report you’re waiting and if nothing else is waiting on the other side it could switch to green and safely let you continue your journey. For emergency vehicles, lights at other junctions on their route could switch red for other road users to let them cross quickly. 

“And of course there’s autonomous vehicles. The terms ‘evolutionary’ and ‘revolutionary’ apply particularly to self-driving vehicles,” says Dalton. “Think about Tesla slowly rolling out autonomous car features versus Google’s more revolutionary ‘here it is, from scratch, no steering wheel…’ approach.” 

Dalton points out the UK, in particular, is looking to lead in self-driving cars. The DfT (Department for Transport) is working hard to create an environment for autonomous vehicles to be developed with little hindrance. This involves looking at policy implications early on around things like insurance, and whether the same rules apply if the occupant is an adult, or a child being taken to school. 

With the introduction of the likes of Uber and Lyft, these innovative services are providing a ‘stepping stone’ towards moving away from everyone owning a vehicle. Although not (yet) autonomous, many people now use Uber as their main transport, especially now the company has introduced cheaper fares by ‘pooling’ with other users. However, it’s still going to be a big jump to persuade citizens to jump in a vehicle with no driver whatsoever.

What are your thoughts on the future of sustainable transport? Let us know in the comments.

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