What is the autonomous driving toolchain?

The autonomous driving toolchain is a toolbox for developers. It is one of three equally-weighted technology fields of autonomous driving.

Autonomous Driving Toolchain Source: Bosch

Autonomous driving developers use the toolchain to develop, test, and validate software-based functionalities, such as distinguishing a pedestrian from a plastic bag, predicting the future movements of objects, or recognizing potential hindrances before pulling out into the road. The toolchain is necessary for rendering autonomous driving applications usable and safe in everyday life.

If you look at the development, test, and validation tools needed to cover the entire autonomous driving chain, you’ll see the landscape is highly fragmented. There are hundreds of specialized open source and closed source tools available today. However, only few of these developer tools interact with each other in an efficient manner.

Individual parts of the autonomous driving toolchain Source: Bosch

The OpenADx initiative is actively addressing this challenge. Bosch and Microsoft have initiated OpenADx together with many further players in this space in 2017. OpenADx aims to bring transparency and better integration capabilities into this highly heterogeneous tool space. It focuses on interfaces between tools and creates an industry-wide reference architecture. A seamlessly integrated set of tools from different vendors enables developers from various companies to structure the development process of autonomous driving applications to be more swift and efficient.

Two men inspecting a small prototype of a autonomous vehicle. Source: Bosch Software Innovations

Lars Geyer-Blaumeiser (on the right), Open Source Expert for OpenADx at Bosch Software Innovations talking to a hackathon participant.

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How Big Data and AI are Driving Business Innovation in 2018

After years of hope and promise, 2018 may be the year when artificial intelligence (AI) gains meaningful traction within Fortune 1000 corporations. This is a key finding of NewVantage Partners’ annual executive survey, first published in 2012. The 2018 survey, published on January 8, represented nearly 60 Fortune 1000 or industry-leading companies, with 93.1% of survey respondents identifying themselves as C-level executive decision-makers. Among the 2018 survey participants were corporate bellwether companies, including American Express, Capital One, Ford Motors, Goldman Sachs, MetLife, Morgan Stanley, and Verizon.

The main finding of the 2018 survey is that an overwhelming 97.2% of executives report that their companies are investing in building or launching big data and AI initiatives. Among surveyed executives, a growing consensus is emerging that AI and big data initiatives are becoming closely intertwined, with 76.5% of executives indicating that the proliferation and greater availability of data is empowering AI and cognitive initiatives within their organizations.

The survey results make clear that executives now see a direct correlation between big data capabilities and AI initiatives. For the first time, large corporations report that they have direct access to meaningful volumes and sources of data that can feed AI algorithms to detect patterns and understand behaviors. No longer dependent on subsets of data to conduct analyses, these companies combine big data, AI algorithms, and computing power to produce a range of business benefits from real-time consumer credit approval to new product offers. Companies such as American Express and Morgan Stanley have publicly shared stories of their successes within the past year.

Staving Off Disruption

Survey participants comprised executives representing data-intensive industries, notably financial services companies, which constituted 77.2% of the survey respondents. Financial services companies have long been at the forefront of industry due to the large volumes of transactional and customer data that they maintain, and they have developed robust data management and data governance processes over a period of decades. These organizations have been at the forefront in the use of analytics to manage risk, assess customer profitability, and identify target market segments. Industries such as life sciences, while newer to data management, possess vast repositories of scientific and patient data that have gone largely untapped relative to the potential for insight.

Now, many of these mainstream companies are facing threats from data-driven competitors that have no legacy processes and have built highly agile data cultures. Companies like Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Apple are among the most prominent disruptive threats to these traditional industry leaders. As mainstream companies increase their investment in big data and AI initiatives, they face a range of issues and challenges as they seek to organize to compete against data-driven competitors. This concern is highlighted in the 2018 survey results.

A clear majority (79.4%) of executives report that they fear the threat of disruption and potential displacement from these advancing competitors. In response to the threat of disruption, companies are increasing their investment in big data and AI initiatives. In the 2018 survey, 71.8% of executives indicate that investments in AI will have the greatest impact on their ability to stave off disruption (in the next decade). Although overall investments in AI and big data initiatives continue to be relatively modest for most large corporations, 12.7% of executives report that they have invested half a billion dollars in these initiatives to date. If the fear of disruption is any indication, this number can be expected to increase.

Driving Innovation Through AI

Executives indicate that investments in big data and AI are beginning to yield meaningful results. Nearly three-fourths of executives surveyed (73.2%) report that their organizations are now achieving measurable results from their big data and AI investments. In particular, executives report notable successes in initiatives to improve decision-making through advanced analytics — with a 69% success rate — and through expense reduction, with a 60.9% success rate. Businesses are also using big data and AI investments to accelerate time-to-market for new products and services (54.1% success rate) and to improve customer service (53.4% success rate). Yet, just over one-fourth (27.3%) of executives report success thus far in monetizing their big data and AI investments. This remains an elusive goal for most organizations.

Nearly one-fourth (23.9%) of respondents report that their investments in big data and AI are highly transformational and innovative for their organization, and potentially disruptive for their industry. But 43.8% of executives report that innovation and disruption initiatives involving big data and AI yield successful results for their organizations.

As mainstream companies look to the future, there is a growing consensus that AI holds the key. With 93% of executives identifying artificial intelligence as the disruptive technology their company is investing in for the future, there appears to be common agreement that companies must leverage cognitive technologies to compete in an increasingly disruptive period. Investment in AI can be expected to increase as organizations position themselves to compete in the future. Those companies that prove themselves to be adept at developing and executing initiatives using big data and AI capabilities will likely be the companies that are best positioned to deflect the threats of agile, data-driven competitors in the decade ahead.


MIT Sloan Management Review

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

IHS Markit Identifies Top Trends Driving the Internet of Things in 2018 and Beyond

Number of connected IoT devices to top 31 billion in 2018.

Driven by the need for intelligent connected devices in industrial and commercial applications, the number of connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices globally will grow to more than 31 billion in 2018, according to new analysis from business information provider IHS Markit.

The commercial and industrial sector, powered by building automation, industrial automation and lighting, is forecast to account for about half of all new connected devices between 2018 and 2030.

Jenalea Howell, research director for IoT connectivity and smart cities at IHS Markit, said:

“The IoT is not a recent phenomenon, but what is new is it’s now working hand in hand with other transformative technologies like artificial intelligence and the cloud. This is fueling the convergence of verticals such as industrial IoT, smart cities and buildings, and the connected home, and it’s increasing competitiveness.”

In its latest IoT Trend Watch report, IHS Markit identifies four key drivers and the trends that will impact the IoT this year and beyond:

Innovation and competitiveness

  • The IoT opportunity has attracted numerous duplicative and overlapping wireless solutions such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 5G, NB-IoT, LoRa and Sigfox. Standards consolidation lies ahead, but confusion and fragmentation will dominate in the near term.
  • Enterprises are leveraging the location of data as a competitive advantage — and as a result, a hybrid approach to cloud and data center management is taking hold. More and more companies will employ both on-premises data centers and off-premises cloud services to manage their IT infrastructure.

Business models

  • 5G builds upon earlier investments in M2M (machine-to-machine) and traditional IoT applications, enabling significant increases in economies of scale that drive adoption and utilization across all sectors of industry. Improved low-power requirements, the ability to operate on licensed and unlicensed spectrum, and better coverage will drive significantly lower costs across the IoT.
  • Cellular IoT gateways, which facilitate WAN connectivity, will be integral to edge computing deployments. 2018 will bring increased focus on compute capabilities and enhanced security for cellular IoT gateways.

Standardization and security

  • Cybersecurity is a leading concern for IoT adopters. IoT deployments face critical cybersecurity risks because there are potentially many more IoT devices to secure compared to traditional IT infrastructure devices, presenting increased risk to traditional communications and computing systems, as well as physical health and safety.
  • Despite the promise it holds, blockchain — a technology for securely storing and transferring data — is not a panacea. Initially, IoT applications for blockchain technology will focus on asset tracking and management.

Wireless technology innovation

  • IoT platforms are becoming more integrated. Currently, there are more than 400 IoT platform providers. Many vendors are using integration to compete more effectively, providing highly integrated functionality for IoT application developers and adopters.
  • Significant innovation will occur when IoT app developers can leverage data from myriad deployed sensors, machines and data stores. A key inflection point for the IoT will be the gradual shift from the current “Intranets of Things” deployment model to one where data can be exposed, discovered, entitled and shared with third-party IoT application developers.

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IoT Business News

Interview: Driving economic growth in the smart city of tomorrow

Interview: Driving economic growth in the smart cities of tomorrow

How does a smart city best leverage IoT technology to drive economic growth, Internet of Business asks Vanja Subotic, director of product management at Chordant, part of InterDigtal?

Smart city technologies could drive more than 5 percent incremental growth and $ 20 trillion in additional economic benefits over the coming decade. That’s the bold claim made in a new report commissioned by mobile technology R&D specialist Interdigital on behalf of its Chordant smart cities-focused business, and produced in partnership with market research company ABI Research, Roles of Smart Cities for Economic Development. 

Those are some pretty big numbers and presumably involved some fairly complex calculations in the background, so Internet of Business spoke to Vanja Subotic, director of product management at Chordant InterDigtal, to discuss some of the issues raised in the report.

Read more: Cisco announces $ 1 billion smart cities fund

What’s the connection?

Internet of Business [IoB]: Your report makes a strong argument that smart city development is important to the wider economic development of cities – but can you explain the connection?

Interview: Driving economics growth from smart cities

Vanja Subotic of Chordant (InterDigital)

Vanja Subotic: Smart city developments, which include improvements in mobility, infrastructure, established practices and the overall quality of life, are instrumental in attracting businesses and consequently citizens living in those cities and working for those business. It is a bit of a ‘chicken and egg’ situation, where smart city technologies aid in economic development, but increased economic development requires more investments in smart cities.

IoB: And how will open data policies impact the development of smart cities?

Vanja Subotic: Open data policies enable public data sharing among different city departments and outside with individuals and businesses. This in turn allows stakeholders to better understand situations and trends, while solving various challenges. By bringing all data assets into one environment cities can open the door to innovation that will result in efficiencies and benefits to citizens.

Read more: Juniper Research names UK’s top ten smart cities

Hoping it sticks

IoB: InterDigital has already said that this is not a case of deploying technology and ‘hoping it sticks’, but of city administrators making careful, strategic decisions. What do they need to consider in order to maximize their chances of success?

Vanja Subotic: Even in the technology realm, city administrators need to consider standards-based solutions to promote thriving ecosystems. Beyond that, there are other important factors to consider. City administrators will need to ask themselves what kind of cities they want to become and what the priority services and areas should be. This will require city stakeholders to think carefully about public-private partnerships, open data policies, citizen input and participation. This of course won’t be possible without a seamless procurement and execution process.

IoB: Are there any significant pitfalls that smart city administrators should look out for?

Vanja Subotic: Deploying technology isn’t always a simple process, so there are definitely pitfalls to be considered by smart city administrators. For example, not understanding existing governing structure, departments and data can hamper efforts, while struggling to secure funding and failing to apply a priority/phased approach can also significantly reduce the success of smart city projects. City administrators should also take into account working with legacy systems, the needs of citizens and properly ensuring an equitable approach across the socio-economic strata.

Read more: Climate change will be among KPIs for smart cities by 2020, says Gartner

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Internet of Business

Ericsson Implements the Autonomous Driving Project in Sweden

In the past, we had seen self-driving shuttle buses started sharing the road with pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicles in Stockholm. The shuttle buses define the future of urban transport. Ericsson has implemented an autonomous driving project with the aid of local partners such as Nobina, SJ, Stockholm City, Klövern, KTH and Urban ICT Arena. The project aims to test the driverless buses on public roads under real traffic conditions.

The testing is done keeping in mind varying weather conditions, remote take-over and human response. Ericsson has provided the Connected Urban Transport (CUT) solution that will do the monitoring of the self-driving buses. The testing of the buses connectivity to a 5G network will be carried out in the second half of the 6-month trial run.

Drive Sweden is said to be a strategic innovation program launched by the Swedish government. The program involves partners from all sectors of society. Issues such as the challenges and opportunities of road safety, adaptation of infrastructure and transport-related legislation will be addressed.

To know more, click here.

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