8 Must-Ask IoT Connectivity Questions

The Internet of Things (IoT) holds incredible opportunities for businesses, their partners, and end users, and much of its promise hinges on connections that exchange data and automate processes without human intervention. Cellular connectivity plays a key role with nomadic devices enabling a wide range of IoT technology.

By 2020, approximately 252 million healthcare devices will record patients’ respiration, blood pressure, and other vital signs. On our highways, 965 million automotive devices will collect information about vehicle maintenance, the nearest gas stations, traffic, and even pedestrians entering walkways. Smart city devices, the number of which is expected to reach 7.5 billion, will monitor water systems, traffic congestion, sidewalk damage, and pollution.

Connectivity among people, machines, and things is increasing exponentially. Enabling communications among billions of people and things represents a tremendous opportunity. However, for an enterprise to take advantage of the IoT and to build a thriving ecosystem, they must begin by asking themselves the right questions.

Eight must-ask questions:

  1. Are you prepared to scale?
  2. How will you manage operator contracts and connections?
  3. Is the last mile of the IoT rock-solid reliable?
  4. Can you IoT ecosystem connect to disparate networks?
  5. Can your network affordably handle additional traffic?
  6. What is your security and data protection plan?
  7. Can you support a global IoT strategy?
  8. Can you integrate connectivity management across any type of environment?

The value of IoT is undeniable, but so too is the potential cost, risk, and complexity of enabling the vast ecosystem. An honest assessment of these questions is critical to not only survive but to thrive in the world of Internet of things.

I will further explore some of these questions in detail through my subsequent blogs. Meanwhile, for a deeper dive into these eight questions, I invite you to read the SAP Digital Interconnect whitepaper “Best Practices for Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds of the Internet of Things”.


Internet of Things – Digitalist Magazine

One size doesn’t fit all – for business case flexibility you need security and connectivity choices

As the Internet of Things (IoT) continues to mature, organisations are looking to select enabling technologies, services and solutions to turn their business ideas into reality. Among the many fundamental capabilities required, connectivity and security are among the most visible as Richard Stamvik, managing ecosystem and partnerships at MultiTech, discusses in this interview with IoT Now.

IoT Now: There are many decisions to be made to ensure optimal IoT deployments. What factors should organisations take into account when making connectivity decisions?

Richard Stamvik: There are several challenges for organisations: How large is the area they intend to operate in – is it a building or a country? What quality of service do they need and how much are they prepared to pay for that? What’s the acceptable energy consumption of the IoT solution as this relates to the cost of power from, for example, batteries? And what’s the amount of data to be transmitted and what are the related speed and latency requirements?

Different technologies have different pros and cons. For example, short range Bluetooth technology offers low energy consumption and high data rates. Similarly, you can roll-out low energy, long range low power wide area (LPWA) technologies such as LoRa or narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) but these won’t offer the high data rate of 3G or 4G.

A key learning here is that one size does not fit all.

IoT Now: Choosing between licensed and unlicensed spectrum is a core challenge. How can organisations judge the relative merits?

RS: The right to use licensed spectrum costs money, payable to the body managing the regional radio spectrum allocation. Here we find the 3GPP cellular ecosystem with operators offering worldwide network coverage and equipment providers with footprint across the globe. Licensed spectrum offers good quality of service, high reliability and low latency, and is suitable for critical or real-time control usecases.

Anyone can use unlicensed spectrum and this offers a quick route to market and cost advantages for infrastructure, devices and services which are all becoming widespread, with both private and public deployments across the world. Here we find LoRa and a several other technologies. Licensed and unlicensed spectrum both have their pros and cons and usecase requirements must govern which to select.

IoT Now: Among the wide range of unlicensed options, why are organisations choosing LoRa solutions?

RS: There has been a big uptake of LoRa solutions because other unlicensed technology alternatives are either immature, have small ecosystem and deployment footprint or unsuitable business proposition, and licensed technology alternatives such as cellular NB-IoT or LTE category M1 haven’t been widely available. Cellular options such as 3G and 4G were not really designed for low bandwidth and low energy consumption applications whereas LoRa would fit the requirements as well as offer an industry standard and a growing ecosystem of product and service providers.

There’s a massive diversity in use cases which means many different approaches are required. Consider the business case options; once you have bought your cellular devices you pay a recurring fee to an operator, whereas after your investment in unlicensed […]

The post One size doesn’t fit all – for business case flexibility you need security and connectivity choices appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Blogs – IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business

Assessing a sustainable IoT future: Why security and connectivity barriers must be overcome

What will the connected world look like in 2030? According to a new report from Wipro Digital, a sustainable future will be achieved but only if certain barriers are conquered first.

The report, developed together by Wipro and non-profit organization Forum for the Future, found that although 98% of business leaders are sure that data and connectivity will contribute to a sustainable future, only 50% of them utilise them to support such efforts.

According to the study, the future vision for an IoT driven connectivity can be achieved when business leaders overcome some barriers associated with IoT, data and connectivity. Some of the barriers highlighted in the report include security risks and lack of necessary governance for artificial intelligence and IoT.

The business leaders industry experts surveyed for preparing the report have highlighted some concrete examples in which IoT, data and connectivity can help in driving a sustainable future. These examples include the use of technologies such as augmented reality and virtual reality to help in understanding global challenges and empathising in situations that are distant from the individual; and use of data to inform and empower citizens to express their views and ideas to create the future of their dreams.

Jayraj Nair, VP and global head of IoT at Wipro Limited, said: "IoT, data and connectivity are changing the way we live and work – disrupting industries and reshaping the social landscape. To ensure these advances have a positive impact on the future, grow our economies and drive sustainable efforts, we must successfully and efficiently harness these technologies. The Vision 2030 report imagines a world where we can do just that, and offers suggestions on how to make those visions a reality."

Elsewhere, a report from Navigant Research projected that the global combined cumulative revenue for IIoT devices, software and services will surpass $ 1 trillion by 2027.

iottechnews.com: Latest from the homepage

Combining cellular and Wi-Fi for cost, connectivity, reliability — A Webinar

When we think of the applicable functionality that a hybrid connectivity solution would provide, multiple use cases come to mind. Everything from connected solar panels to smart cities to point of sale monitoring to security benefit from a lower cost, more reliable hybrid connectivity solution. For example, within the trucking industry (or for any roadway vehicle), cellular connections would work best while the vehicle is in motion, needing GSP or emergency services. While in the depot, however, Wi-Fi would be a fiscally sound (lower cost) pathway for transmitting static data, such as driver logs, says Carmi Brandis of Aeris.

Singular issues, single solution

The rapid expansion of the Aeris hybrid solution is a direct result of the multiple connectivity issues that exist today. Individually, cellular or Wi-Fi connectivity each have some drawbacks, but with a hybrid connectivity solution, specific problems can be resolved.

At the basic level, cellular connectivity has several challenges, such as poor indoor penetration, but coverage improves with Wi-Fi. Cellular power consumption expenses come down with a hybrid solution, as do high data usage costs. Additionally, Wi-Fi brings its own issues, including coverage, security, device provisioning, diagnostics, and minimal visibility and control.

The Aeris hybrid solution overcomes these by using just a single platform for provisioning, billing, reporting, diagnostics, troubleshooting, and traffic policy configuration. And with a hybrid implementation, deployment is easy and operational complexities are radically reduced.

So, as a business owner, presently paying for connectivity, the questions you need to ask should revolve around coverage, cost, and ease of use. The Aeris solution prevents carrier lock-in, thereby affording many more choices for your connectivity needs.

Why hybrid?

The key value propositions of an Aeris hybrid solution include lower cost with higher reliability, improved coverage, and ease of deployment. The Aeris solution reduces operational complexities via a single platform to manage both cellular and Wi-Fi devices; provides enhanced coverage with a layered Wi-Fi and cellular solution that increases connection consistency while improving indoor reception; provides secure connections and authentication controls over cellular and Wi-Fi connections; provides secure connectivity by VPN to the Aeris data center; and provides cost optimisation for the entire IoT device deployment.

Join us

Want to learn more about the implementation and advantages that an IoT hybrid connectivity solution can bring to your business? This Aeris webinar delves into today’s IoT market drivers, challenges, and new opportunities; the pros and cons of each technology; combining cellular and Wi-Wi into a single subscription; hybrid use cases; and the value and key considerations for this new hybrid connectivity model.

Join subject matter experts (451 Research VP Brian Partridge and Aeris product marketing executive Evan Whitelock) in this webinar as they discuss the merits of IoT hybrid solution viability. Register now.

The author of this blog is Carmi Brandis of Aeris

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Combining cellular and Wi-Fi for cost, connectivity, reliability — A Webinar appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Blogs – IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business

ISOC hosts successful inaugural Indigenous Connectivity Summit

If U.S. Senator of New Mexico Tom Udall’s call that “we must do better” to ensure connectivity in Indigenous communities set the tone, delegates of the Indigenous Connectivity Summit (ICS) in Santa Fe this month left with little doubt in our ability to do so.

Whether it’s a pueblo at the top of a mountain or a fly-in region in the Arctic, Internet access in many Indigenous communities is characterized by high costs, low speeds, data caps and poor or non-existent service.

At the Internet Society, we work to make sure the Internet is open and accessible to everyone, everywhere. The ICS was the first event of its kind to focus on ensuring Alaska Native, American Indian, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities have access to affordable, high-quality and sustainable Internet access. We heard from several Indigenous community network operators in North America and abroad about their experiences and the impact it’s had on their communities.

Perhaps the most resonant and inspiring message at the ICS was the potential of Indigenous community networks to provide access where commercial networks do not reach or serve, or areas where they may not be economically viable to operate. Speakers shared success stories of surmounting tremendous obstacles to establish by-the-community-for-the-community networks to close connectivity and cultural gaps.

As Internet Society CEO Kathy Brown put it, “In order to be connected to the economic backbone of the 21st century you have to be connected.”

Similarly, community-driven networks are critical to self-determination. We know that when people get access to the Internet, amazing things can happen. They can share ideas, build communities, start businesses, improve health outcomes, access education opportunities and support cultural and language preservation. This list of possibilities is endless.

As several ICS attendees noted, successful community networks also involve community networking.

The ICS was a good starting venue for community network manager/operators, Indigenous-owned Internet service providers, community members, researchers and policy makers, and Indigenous leadership to have a broader discussion about the value of connecting with each other to build capacity. We’re incredibly grateful to the youth, participants and speakers who dedicated valuable time to contributing to well-rounded conversations.

But the work has just begun.

As Kathy said at the outset of the Summit, to be truly successful in our mission to ensure all communities can get connected, “We can’t just fly in and fly out.”

The ICS was the start of a much larger and very critical conversation about how we can work and partner with Indigenous communities to ensure they can connect themselves to the Internet on their own terms.

To keep the ball rolling, we are working on a report on the ICS to make knowledge publicly available and contribute to future discussions with key stakeholders.

Internet Society will also continue its work to foster an enabling environment where Indigenous communities can connect and build community networks. This includes developing strategic partnerships and supporting opportunities for education and capacity building, initiatives that promote infrastructure, as well as supportive governance and policies.

Just as community networks are built and operated by people working together and combining resources, it took many efforts to make ICS possible and accessible to all.

Internet Society is incredibly thankful to its partners at First Mile Connectivity Consortium, New Mexico Techworks, 1st-Mile Institute and the recently-created Internet Society New Mexico chapter. We would also like to thank our event sponsors who played an equally important part in bring the event to fruition, including Google, the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), REDI Net, and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Their support and generosity was critical to the success of the ICS.

The Internet is a powerful tool for change, but we can’t meaningfully move forward if millions are left behind. ISOC was founded by some of the Internet’s earliest pioneers and we have an important mission to work for an Internet that is open, global and secure – today and for future generations.

We encourage all ICS delegates to keep the momentum going by sharing what they’ve learned with people in their own communities and networks. Use our discussions to set goals, influence policy makers, and develop solutions and business models that respond to individual community connectivity needs now and into the future. 

Did you miss the Indigenous Connectivity Summit?

To learn more and access video of panels, presentations and discussion, please visit the event’s page.

The post ISOC hosts successful inaugural Indigenous Connectivity Summit appeared first on Internet Society.

Internet Society