Google buys Xively for $50M: Marks LogMeIn’s exit from IoT connectivity market

Google announced yesterday that it will acquire Xively from LogMeIn for $ 50M. This marks Google consolidation in the managed IoT marketplace as the latter expects 20 billion connected things to come online by 2020.

Structure connected product data to make it manageable and actionable.

Xively allows enterprises to activate ‘connected products’ whereby its platform offers several features such as device connectivity, data management, identity management, integrations, security, and analytics. Smart home, smart energy, and connected products are typical use cases of Xively’s platform.

The acquisition will allow Google’s customers to add connectivity to their devices from the beginning as opposed to adding it as an ‘after-thought’. This will make the connection between the cloud-mobile app and ‘connected product’ more efficient and easy.

“This acquisition, subject to closing conditions, will complement Google Cloud’s effort to provide a fully managed IoT service that easily and securely connects, manages and ingests data from globally dispersed devices.”Antony Passemard, product management lead for Google Cloud IoT

LogMeIn sold Xively to focus on ‘unified communications’ market. Two popular products it owns in the space are GoToMeeting and Join.me. Thus, the sale will give LogMeIn the much-needed cash it needs to purchase Jive communications, a cloud-based phone services company for $ 357M. LogMeIn also plans to expand its AI-powered customer engagement portfolio. The deal is even better for LogMeIn considering it bought Xively for $ 12 million in 2014.

As for Google, it gets a well-established ‘connected products’ management platform that it will upsell to its existing and new customers of Google Cloud IoT. And, Xively can itself become a ‘billion’ dollar business unit within Google as the latter’s combined cloud business generates nearly $ 1B in revenues.

Another acquisition that took place last month was that of elnfochips. It was acquired by Arrow Electronics to consolidate its IoT market via elnfochips’ 1,500 IoT solution architects, engineers, and software development resources globally.


Postscapes: Tracking the Internet of Things

Cellular IoT connectivity is not an internet experience, it’s a secure, dedicated connection

Analysys Mason’s research director Tom Rebbeck caught up with Arkessa chief executive, Andrew Orrock, to talk about how the barriers to IoT adoption are gradually falling, and how mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) can succeed in a market with numerous large global mobile network operators (MNOs)

Tom Rebbeck: There’s a general feeling that IoT has been a bit slower than expected to take off. Is that your feeling as well and if so, why do you think that’s the case?

Andrew Orrock: With enterprise that has been the case. We have seen concerns – around sourcing, the business case, scaling, security and platform integration – but gradually these barriers are coming down.

A lot of people think about mobile connectivity based on their experience with internet on a smartphone. This has coloured views as to what cellular means as people do not see it as a secure dedicated connection. But, once you get into the discussion about managed services, and we show that we can give customers the tools to manage and monitor the data connections, manage the billing, and provide a secure private network we can show that we are not simply connecting our customers devices to the internet – far from it. When we explain all of this to our channel partners, they realise they can go to their customers and get around the problems they have had in the past – they can show how our network infrastructure works and that it is secure and private.

TR: So it has been slow as it has taken time for people to realise what it means to using a mobile network for IoT connectivity?

AO: Yes, there has had to be some education. The idea of the traditional SIM card provided by a mobile operator essentially locks a customer in. If you are deploying devices around the world, or even across one country then the idea of single sourcing from an MNO with traditional SIM cards has been a problem.

Today the role of an MVNO is much clearer. We can provide multiple networks through a single relationship, a single contract providing commercial, technical and customer support. That creates a much better reaction in companies both small and large.

In the near future, the reprogrammable embedded subscriber identity module (eSIM) will give enterprises more comfort and more control and flexibility. The same solution will work globally with a range of different cellular technologies, from 2G to 5G and the cellular flavours of low power wide area (LPWA) technologies, like narrowband IoT (NB-IoT).

TR: Earlier you talked about the challenges of sourcing. What did you mean by that?

AO: The companies that have deployed IoT and that have shown most growth tend to be small to medium enterprises (SMEs). From a sourcing point of view, the larger enterprises manage their supplier lists quite closely and it can be difficult for SMEs to get onto these lists.

What we have found works well is to work with finished goods distributors or IT systems integrators. They are often already […]

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Qualcomm Announces a New LTE IoT SDK in Support of the Commercialization of IoT Solutions Using Cellular Connectivity

Qualcomm Announces a New LTE IoT SDK in Support of the Commercialization of IoT Solutions Using Cellular Connectivity

Qualcomm Announces a New LTE IoT SDK in Support of the Commercialization of IoT Solutions Using Cellular Connectivity

Designed to Allow Manufacturers to Utilize the Processing Capabilities of the Qualcomm MDM9206 LTE IoT Global Multimode Modem to Develop Cost-effective, Power-efficient IoT Solutions.

Qualcomm Technologies, today announced a new LTE IoT Software Development Kit (SDK) for the Qualcomm® MDM9206 LTE IoT global multimode modem.

This new LTE IoT SDK is designed to assist original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), application and solution developers, new IoT entrants and other non-traditional ecosystem players in the creation of new cellular-enabled IoT applications, products and solutions – accessing the power of the application processor, connectivity, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) capabilities and peripheral interfaces integrated in the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem which is currently featured in various IoT hardware modules from third-party providers.

Along with the recently announced Qualcomm Technologies’ wireless edge services which is being developed to help provide a set of trusted services for enterprise and IoT cloud providers, this new LTE IoT SDK is part of Qualcomm Technologies’ overall efforts to address some of the key challenges within IoT.

This new LTE IoT SDK is designed to support developers while they run custom software on the integrated 1.3 GHz Cortex A7 CPU within the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem, as well as to provide developers with access to Qualcomm Technologies’ extensive suite of software and tools which are designed to make available some of the additional capabilities of the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem, such as GNSS.

The integrated CPU within the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem also is designed to help eliminate the need for an external microcontroller, which is anticipated to help improve cost-efficiency, battery life and device security.

The MDM9206 LTE IoT modem has pre-integrated support for many cloud platforms, including Alibaba Cloud Link One, China Mobile OneNET, DTSTON DTCloud, Ericsson IoT Accelerator, Gizwits and Verizon ThingSpace. The LTE IoT SDK is designed to allow developers to extend this further and develop support for other major IoT cloud providers. Using hardware modules featuring the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem, along with this new LTE IoT SDK, is expected to help OEMs and developers address a vast array of the existing and emerging cellular-connected use cases for commercial and industrial IoT such as smart metering, smart gateways, asset tracking and more.

“As a leader in wireless technology, Qualcomm Technologies is pleased to provide solutions that can help accelerate the development of a global Internet of Things,” said Serge Willenegger, senior vice president and general manager, 4G/5G and Industrial IOT, Qualcomm Wireless GmbH.

“As a new element of Qualcomm Technologies’ wireless edge solutions, the LTE IoT SDK, combined with modules based on our MDM9206 LTE IoT chipset, is designed to help OEMs and developers build and commercialize a wide range of exciting and innovative IoT applications in a cost-efficient and expedited manner.”

The MDM9206 LTE IoT modem is a purpose-built solution designed to support global multimode capabilities, including both eMTC (Cat M1) and NB-IoT (Cat NB-1), as well as 2G/E-GPRS. The MDM9206 LTE IoT modem, along with this new LTE IoT SDK, is designed to facilitate the development of cost-effective, low-power devices designed for multi-year battery life and greater coverage compared to traditional LTE. To date, nearly 90 designs are using the MDM9206 LTE IoT modem with global multimode support for LTE categories M1 and NB1.

This new LTE IoT SDK for the MDM9206 modem is expected to be available in the first half of this year.

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IoT Business News

Sigfox posts €50 million in revenue, reiterates plans for 60 country connectivity in 2018

Sigfox, the French-based Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity provider, has announced its 2017 results and 2018 roadmap, promising a network of 60 countries and more than a billion people worldwide.

Revenues went up to €50 million (£44.4m), a rise of more than 56% year over year, according to the company, while the total number of objects connected to the Sigfox network rose by 65% to a total of 2.5 million. Alongside this, the company’s network grew to 45 countries earlier this month, including Malaysia, South Korea, and Switzerland.

Looking at the company’s 2018 roadmap, alongside its network figures Sigfox is promising greater focus on its evangelisation strategy. To that end, the provider is launching Hacking House, a project that will ‘bring together students from around the world to learn about IoT and Sigfox’s pioneering technology’, as the company put it.

“There is tremendous value in IoT, which lies in the data that is generated by millions of connected objects across the globe,” said Ludovic Le Moan, co-founder and CEO of Sigfox in a statement. “It’s up to us to turn this golden opportunity into a multi-billion dollar industry, just like we did with petrol a century ago.

“Our challenge for the next few years will be to lower the cost of collecting that data to close to zero,” Le Moan added.

This makes for an interesting comparison when looking at Sigfox’s proclamations in November 2016. The company had just secured a €150m funding round and promised then what it promises today – coverage in 60 countries by 2018.

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Indigenous Connectivity Summit Participants Share Their Stories

Madeleine Redfern, the mayor of Iqaluit – the largest and only city in Nunavut, Canada – has a colorful way of describing how sparsely populated the territory is. “The seals outnumber the people.” With a population of just over 35,000 people spread out over an arctic 1,750,000 square kilometers, Internet access is a challenge. In fact, according to Redfern, her most favorited tweet was that she couldn’t tweet… because the connection was too slow.

Madeleine Redfern participated in the first ever Indigenous Connectivity Summit last November. She and other participants shared their experience and expertise to help close the connectivity gap in Indigenous communities. Many also sat down for brief interviews with the 1st-Mile Institute, a New Mexico nonprofit that has initiated a local “Broadband for All” program. The videos are now available to watch on the 1st-Mile Institute’s website.

You can also find the videos on the Internet Society’s Indigenet page, which includes resources from the Summit including the presentations, the policy brief Spectrum Approaches for Community Networks, and other ways to get involved!

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