From Zero to One Hundred in the Arctic Slope

In November 2017, the Internet Society hosted the inaugural Indigenous Connectivity Summit in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The event brought together community network operators, Internet service providers, community members, researchers, policy makers, and Indigenous leadership. One of the participants shared her story.

“‘Mom, did you have YouTube?’” Patuk Glenn, recalls her six year old son asking. Glenn, who lives in Utqiaġvik – a city in Alaska north of the Arctic Circle – laughs as she remembers one of his first words: “loading,” thanks to the sluggish Internet speeds on the Arctic Slope. But things are changing, and soon. Fiber optic cable is going live in Glenn’s community and she has travelled to the Indigenous Connectivity Summit looking for lessons from other Indigenous communities. “We’re going from zero to one hundred overnight,” says Glenn. “How can we best prepare our people?”

It’s not just a question of digital literacy. Glenn’s looking for information on cybersecurity and entrepreneurship – as high-speed Internet opens avenues for economic development and for community members to share their own content with the rest of the world. Like many summit participants, Glenn sees connectivity as a pathway to enable education: not only unlocking online courses, but empowering self-education. “Even just having a question, and being able to Google the answer,” says Glenn. “It makes a huge difference.”

Let’s continue the conversation! Do you want to connect your Indigenous community or support Indigenous connectivity? The Indigenous Connectivity page includes ever-growing resources on topics including community networks, cultural preservation, and Indigenous-driven access. Our hope is to connect Indigenous communities all over the world. Join us!

Photo ©Minesh Bacrania

The post From Zero to One Hundred in the Arctic Slope appeared first on Internet Society.

Internet Society

Norwegian salmon farmers Cermaq to build smart factory in Arctic Circle

Norwegian salmon farmers Cermaq building smart factory in Arctic Circle

Norwegian salmon and trout farming company Cermaq claims that it is building the world’s first smart factory for salmon in the Arctic Circle.

Following the closure of two processing sites in Norway, the company has tasked German food processing machinery manufacturer Baader and Norwegian automatic identification company CodeIT with building the new state of the art factory. Cermaq is hoping to tap into some of the benefits that have come with the advent of Industry 4.0.

Located in Storskjæret, a part of the Steigen municipality within Nordland county, northern Norway, the factory has been under construction since March 2017, with the first fish anticipated to enter the site by in the second half of 2018.

Visibility of supply chain is key

Atle Kvist is leading the project from Cermaq’s side. Commenting on the plans, Kvist said: “We as an industry are being more and more challenged on documentation and traceability, our green footprint is important to all our future planning and this is why we have chosen CodeIT AS to deliver a solution that fits our requirements very well. They specialize in intelligent and flexible software that gives us the control and visibility we need.”

Cermaq says that while Baader is supplying the machinery, CodeIT is supplying the cross platform inter connectivity and digitization of the new Industry 4.0 facility, supposedly one of the first of its kind in seafood. Working behind the scenes for almost a year, CodeIT has designed a specific product that enables Cermaq to connect and integrate all of the surrounding machines in the production environment.

(Photo: CodeIT)

Read more: Fishing for profits: Colombian shrimp farmers catch on to IoT

Cermaq chases a modern salmon facility

“A modern salmon facility takes in the fish, evaluates quality, weight, grading etc. and during all processes automatically determines which department the fish should go to,” said Bjørnar Torsnes, CEO, CodeIT.

“Once we introduce truly interconnected intelligence to these processes we can create efficiency at several orders of magnitude higher than was previously capable. For example, calculating the appropriate ice dosing for different geographical locations of shipments.”

Read more: Smart water project helps preserve freshwater mussels in Ohio River

The post Norwegian salmon farmers Cermaq to build smart factory in Arctic Circle appeared first on Internet of Business.

Internet of Business

Facing The Arctic Challenge At The World’s Most Northerly Wind Farm

Situated on a remote island at the far tip of Norway, Havøygavlen is the world’s most northerly wind farm.

Deep in the Arctic Circle, the weather here is both unpredictable and extreme. Temperatures can drop to -25°C and winds can howl at over 180km/h.

So why build a wind farm in such a hostile location? The Arctic offers massive potential to generate clean, renewable energy due to the high average wind speed (around 30km/h) and the fact that colder air is denser, meaning it carries more kinetic energy.

Designing a wind farm to handle these conditions is challenging. The wind and cold make the turbines wear faster than in other locations.

When the wind is from the south, it comes in a smooth stream, perfect for large-scale wind turbines. But when it’s from the north, it rises up the cliff face from all directions in a very turbulent stream that can present negative wind shear and other problematic wind phenomena. This turbulent wind places extraordinary loads on the pitch and yaw mechanisms that are used to adjust the blades and keep the turbines facing into the wind to capture the most energy.

For the bearings it is necessary to use a lubricant that won’t freeze, and one whose properties remain largely constant over a wide range of temperatures. The cold can also cause icing on the rotor blades, potentially unbalancing rotors and reducing power output of the turbines.

Maintenance is therefore a primary concern for Havøygavlen’s owners, Arctic Wind. Unprepared for such harsh conditions, the wind farm’s early years were hardly a success. The turbines twice had rotor blades sheared clean off, and once a turbine even collapsed to the ground in a storm.

It’s not just the extreme weather that makes life difficult for the Arctic Wind team. Transporting spare parts and maintenance crews to such a remote location is a logistical nightmare, and during the Arctic winter the area is plunged into 24-hour darkness.

The identification and prediction of failure are a key part of wind farm operations. When Fedem Technology approached them with a proposal to try a new technology, the operators at Havøygavlen jumped at the chance.

Fedem (which stands for Finite Element Dynamics in Elastic Mechanisms) is a Norwegian company specialising in advanced engineering analysis. It has developed cutting-edge software for modelling structures and mechanical systems under the influence of complex loads.

The software uses a nonlinear structural dynamics approach to simulate the system’s dynamic behaviour and enable new ways to accurately monitor and calculate the remaining life of the asset. The software detects both instantaneous consequences of one-off events and the long-term effects of cyclic loads.

The principle is to create an advanced digital model of physical objects, and update it with remote sensor feeds.

Analysis is run based on the laws of physics. “We create a digital clone of the installation, collect sensor data from the physical structure in the cloud, analyse the data we get in real time, and always have an overview of the structure’s condition,” explained Arnulf Hagen, CEO, Fedem Technology.

Fedem was recently acquired by SAP. With this acquisition, SAP plans to build an end-to-end #IoT solution in which a digital avatar continuously represents the state of operating assets through feeds from sensors, replacing the need for physical inspection with a “digital inspection.”

When you observe the same things remotely through the Internet as you would when you observe the object physically, that’s when you start getting real value for money, says Hagen.

For more on how cutting-edge technology can be used to enable alternative energy sources, see Battery Power From A Bandage?


Internet of Things – Digitalist Magazine