Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Major U.S Operator

Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon

Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon

Quectel Wireless Solutions, a leading global supplier of Internet of Things (IoT) modules, today announced that its BG96 module is the first multimode LPWA module based on Qualcomm modem to receive official Type Approval (TA) from a major U.S. wireless network operator upon conclusion of comprehensive laboratory and field testing.

“The certification is a testament to Quectel’s commitment to delivering high quality and reliable services to our customers. Now customers using our 2G and 3G modules can accelerate their LTE Cat M1 deployment based on the BG96 modules,” said Patrick Qian, Quectel CEO.

BG96, designed for the global market, supports LTE Cat M1, NB-IoT and EGPRS. What’s more, GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BEIDOU, GALILEO and QZSS) is also supported, which will help customers with location requirement on the compact design and low device cost.

Developed based upon Qualcomm’s multimode LTE modem MDM9206, BG96 features ultra-low power consumption, as well as extended indoor coverage with a 15dB coverage enhancement compared with GSM. Besides, it offers a maximum data rate of 300kbps downlink and 375kbps uplink, and can be applied to vertical segments requesting medium and low data rates.

According to Patrick:

“Quectel BG96 modules along with the LTE Cat M1 network will bring new possibilities for IoT innovators to develop devices for markets requiring low cost, mobility and longer battery life, such as smart metering, tracker, sharing bicycle and emergency alarm panel.”

The post Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Major U.S Operator appeared first on IoT Business News.

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Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon

Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon

Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon

Quectel Wireless Solutions, a leading global supplier of Internet of Things (IoT) modules, today announced that its BG96 module is the first multimode LPWA module based on Qualcomm modem to receive official Type Approval (TA) from Verizon upon conclusion of comprehensive laboratory and field testing.

“The certification is a testament to Quectel’s commitment to delivering high quality and reliable services to our customers. Now customers using our 2G and 3G modules can accelerate their LTE Cat M1 deployment based on the BG96 modules,” said Patrick Qian, Quectel CEO.

BG96, designed for the global market, supports LTE Cat M1, NB-IoT and EGPRS. What’s more, GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BEIDOU, GALILEO and QZSS) is also supported, which will help customers with location requirement on the compact design and low device cost.

Developed based upon Qualcomm’s multimode LTE modem MDM9206, BG96 features ultra-low power consumption, as well as extended indoor coverage with a 15dB coverage enhancement compared with GSM. Besides, it offers a maximum data rate of 300kbps downlink and 375kbps uplink, and can be applied to vertical segments requesting medium and low data rates.

According to Patrick:

“Quectel BG96 modules along with Verizon’s LTE Cat M1 network will bring new possibilities for IoT innovators to develop devices for markets requiring low cost, mobility and longer battery life, such as smart metering, tracker, sharing bicycle and emergency alarm panel.”

The post Quectel Receives Industry’s First multimode LPWA Type Approval from Verizon appeared first on IoT Business News.

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Self-driving cars pass first federal hurdle with House panel approval

sohjoa-finland-self-driving-shuttle

A bill to standardize self-driving across all states and exempt tens of thousands of cars every year from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) rules has unanimously passed a House panel vote, paving the way for a full House vote in after the August recess.

The full House Energy and Commerce Committee may vote on it as soon as next week, according to Bloomberg, and there’s a high chance it will make its way through the full House vote.

See Also: Waymo narrows case against Uber as court date nears

It received bipartisan support after Democratic proposals were accepted, including a directive for the NHTSA to write the rules for self-driving cars in 18 months. Automakers also need to show that the autonomous technology is fit for public roads.

“Today’s markup represents the most significant step this subcommittee has taken to date to ultimately enact comprehensive legislation on self-driving technologies and services,” said Bob Latta, the Ohio Republican who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection panel. “Our work is not done and we will continue to perfect language as we prepare to move quickly to full-committee markup.”

The legislation would ban all states from regulating self-driving cars, software, and services. Google, Tesla, and other stakeholders want to see the legislation pass, as some states have been slower to legalize parts of self-driving, while others have asked for a lot of private data in return for access to public roads.

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Samsung receives approval to test self-driving cars in South Korea

Autonomous and happy family

Samsung has received approval to test self-driving vehicles in South Korea and will begin with a “Hyundai equipped with the latest cameras and sensors,” according to The Korean Herald.

Little is known about Samsung’s intentions at this time. The move comes a few weeks after Apple received similar approval to test self-driving vehicles in California.

See Also: Peugeot unveils self-driving car concept that adapts to your mood

Two years ago, the firm established a team to work on self-driving tech, but did not say if it planned to enter the market or simply partner with others.

To test self-driving cars in the country, the company had to receive approval from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport. Hyundai, Uber, and Toyota have all went through the same approval process before.

Samsung has declined to comment on the approval. It has also not said if it plans to expand the tests to Silicon Valley or Europe.

Samsung is new to cars

Like Apple, Samsung has no experience building vehicles. It does have more companies that it supplies components to, however, which may give them a better understanding of the hardware and software behind modern automotive technologies.

Samsung might see Apple’s move into automotive and self-driving as confirmation of the next battleground for tech companies. Google has been working on the technology for years and Uber, the ride-hailing giant, has started investing millions into its own driverless project.

The company has been embroiled in a national scandal in South Korea for the past few months, and while the approval might routine to Westerns, it may be perceived as the government continuing to give Samsung favors and access.

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