The installed base of wireless IoT devices in agriculture reached 17.0 million in 2016

The installed base of wireless IoT devices in agriculture reached 17.0 million in 2016

The installed base of wireless IoT devices in agriculture reached 17.0 million in 2016

According to a new research report from the M2M/IoT analyst firm Berg Insight, the installed base of wireless IoT devices in agricultural production worldwide reached 17.0 million connections in 2016.

The number of wireless connections is forecasted to grow at compound annual growth rate of 10.0 percent to reach 27.4 million in 2021.

There is a broad range of wireless technologies used in agricultural production with different characteristics and use cases. 802.15.4-based standards comprise the most employed wireless technology due to its wide adoption in dairy cow monitoring applications. The main application areas for cellular communication are machine telematics and remote monitoring via in-field sensor systems. Cellular connections amounted to 0.8 million at the end of 2016 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 30.2 percent to reach 3.1 million in 2021. LPWA technologies are expected to achieve the highest growth rate and realise a significant market position in the remote monitoring and control segment.

Berg Insight’s outlook for the agricultural technology market is positive as agricultural production remains greatly underpenetrated by wireless IoT solutions. Manufacturers of farm and dairy equipment have traditionally chosen to partner with smaller and specialised players but increasingly focus on developing proprietary technologies. In the crop production sector, a group of companies have emerged as leaders on the market for precision agriculture solutions. Major providers include Deere & Company, Trimble, Topcon Positioning Systems and Raven Industries. Other significant vendors include AGCO, Ag Leader Technology, DICKEY-john and Hexagon. In the milk production sector, the world’s largest dairy equipment vendor DeLaval offers its in-house developed activity monitoring system along with its milking and dairy farming infrastructure solutions. Important providers of sensor systems for dairy cow monitoring furthermore include Netherlands-based Nedap and The Allflex Group subsidiary SCR which both sell their systems to a number of leading dairy equipment manufacturers and genetics companies.

Fredrik Stålbrand, IoT Analyst, Berg Insight, said:
chart: installed base of active wireless devices in agricultural production (World 2016-2021)

“Leading providers are now investing in technical platforms capable of supporting integration with third-party hardware and software solutions as agricultural equipment are becoming parts of broader systems.”

The increasingly complex technological environment that farmers operate in also demands dealers to offer a greater extent of services to integrate and support the range of technologies that are utilised in advanced production systems. “As interoperability between systems remains as a challenge, the need for services and technical support from local dealers is likely to increase with continued adoption of precision farming solutions, in-field sensor systems and animal monitoring technologies”, concluded Mr. Stålbrand.

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IoT Business News

Samsung 2016 Smart TV Line-Up will be IoT Ready

Samsung Electronics announced that its entire 2016 Smart TV line-up will be Internet of Things (IoT) ready and connected with the SmartThings platform. SmartThings is an open platform that allows users to connect, manage and control smart devices and IoT services.

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Among the 2016 Smart TVs, all Samsung’s 2016 SUHD TVs will apply IoT hub technology, allowing the TV itself to act as the controller for the entire smart home. Samsung developed its own IoT hub technology with SmartThings for 2016 SUHD TVs.

SUHD TVs can connect with and control Samsung devices and SmartThings sensors, as well as more than 200 other SmartThings compatible devices. These include everything from connected lights and locks to thermostats and cameras, from a wide range of high quality third party manufacturers. For the full support of connectivity with SmartThings compatible devices, SmartThings Extend USB adaptor is required.

At CES 2016, Samsung will showcase the future of TV and demonstrate how Samsung’s Smart TVs are at the center of the expanding IoT ecosystem

“The 2016 line-up of Smart TVs will offer consumers new possibilities and cement Samsung’s market leading position, as the first company to launch IoT ready TVs.” said Hyun Suk Kim, President of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics.

“With Samsung Smart TVs working with the SmartThings technology, we have an opportunity to reach millions of households,” said Alex Hawkinson, CEO and Co-founder of SmartThings. “Applying this technology into current household devices is a major step forwards that will make it much easier for everyone to experience the benefits of a smart home.”

SmartThings allows consumers to access all of their smart devices directly from their smartphone and SUHD TV, rather than having to control individual devices with a multitude of separate apps. With the SmartThings application, people can easily connect and manage all of their smart home devices and services through a single, simple user interface.

With an outdoor camera connected to their Samsung Smart TV, customers can check when visitors arrive and choose to open their front door, directly from their sofa. Motion sensor alerts can also pop-up directly on the TV screen, if movement outside the home is picked up, providing more security and peace of mind, whether at home or away.

The SmartThings application’s Cinema Mood also makes it easier than ever to create the perfect home theater environment. It enables consumers to automatically adjust everything from ambient lighting to surround sound, so they can instantly provide the optimal movie viewing experience.

While each 2016 SUHD TV will be enabled with this SmartThings technology, the functionality will be activated regionally as SmartThings expands its platform availability.

To find out more about SmartThings uses and compatible devices, please visitwww.smartthings.com.

IoT Magazine

The number of smart homes in Europe and North America reached 30.3 million in 2016

The number of smart homes in Europe and North America reached 30.3 million in 2016

According to a new research report from Berg Insight, the number smart homes in Europe and North America reached 30.3 million in 2016.

North America is the world’s most advanced smart home market and the region had an installed base of 21.8 million smart homes at the end of the year, a 47 percent year-on-year growth. The strong market growth is expected to last for years to come, driving the number of smart homes in North America to 73.0 million by 2021, which corresponds to 55 percent of all households. The

European market is still a few years behind North America in terms of penetration and market maturity. At the end of 2016, there were 8.5 million smart homes in Europe and the market is forecasted to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 57 percent in the next five years to reach 80.6 million smart homes by 2021, which corresponds to 36 percent of all European households. The most successful products on the smart home market include smart thermostats, security systems, smart light bulbs, network cameras and multi-room audio systems from vendors such as IKEA, Philips Lighting, Honeywell, Belkin, Nest, Ecobee, Somfy, Sonos, Canary, Netatmo and D-Link. Major vendors of comprehensive whole-home smart home systems include a mix of energy-, security- and communication service providers and home automation specialists such as Vivint, ADT, Comcast, Control4 and AT&T in North America and Verisure, eQ-3, RWE, Deutsche Telekom and Loxone in Europe.

“2017 is anticipated to be a good year for smart home technology as entry-level smart home systems have become affordable for the mass market, at the same time as the reliability and features have improved significantly”, says Anders Frick, Senior Analyst at Berg Insight. New innovative user interfaces are also important as a catalyst for market growth.

Mr. Frick continues:

“Several ICT industry giants are now betting on voice driven user interfaces to make it easier to control smart home solutions.”

The Alexa service from Amazon has quickly become very popular through its Echo products and Google is pushing its digital assistant through Google Home. Furthermore, Apple with its HomeKit platform and the HomePod smart speaker as well as Microsoft with its Cortana service and the Invoke speaker are ready to challenge Amazon and Google when the devices are being launched later in 2017. Berg Insight anticipates that the popularity of voice enabled speakers will continue to increase and that smart speakers will be one of the most significant user interfaces in the home environment. “Amazon is still the leading player but Google’s and Apple’s ecosystems are stronger, at least outside North America”, says Mr. Frick.

Berg Insight chart: nimber of smart homes Europe and North America 2015-2021There are additional smart speaker initiatives as well. Lenovo has announced a smart assistant and Japan-based LINE Corporation will launch WAVE using the virtual assistant Clova later in 2017. There are even open source alternatives, such as the assistant Mark 1 from Mycroft. Ivee Voice, Invoxia’s Triby, JAM Voice, Cubic, Fabriq and Zettaly Avy are additional smart speakers on the market.

Download report brochure: Smart Homes and Home Automation

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IoT Business News

IoT malware doubled in 2016, says report from Kaspersky

IoT malware doubled in 2016, according to Kaspersky

The amount of malware targeting IoT devices more than doubled in 2016, according to a report by IT security company Kaspersky.

Researchers there set up ‘honeypots’ that imitated IoT devices running Linux and managed to collect around 7,200 different types of malware preying on IoT devices. Last year, the company detected 3,200 samples.

“After just a few seconds, we saw the first attempted connections to the open telnet port. Over a 24-hour period, there were tens of thousands of attempted connections from unique IP addresses,” the researchers say in their report.

They add that, in most cases, the attempted connections used the telnet protocol; the rest used SSH (Secure Shell protocol). They also noticed that the malware used a set of very common, and thus very vulnerable, usernames and passwords in order to access the IoT devices.

According to the report, of the types of devices from which the attacks originated, over 63 percent of them were identified as DVR services or IP cameras, while about 20 percent were network devices and routers from major manufacturers. One percent were Wi-Fi repeaters and other network hardware, TV tuners, VOIP devices, Tor exit nodes, printers and ‘smart home’ devices. Some one in five, meanwhile, could not be identified.

Read more: Industroyer takes spotlight in latest IT security scare

Malware on enterprise IoT devices

The company said that its honeytraps not only recorded attacks coming from network hardware classed as home devices, but also enterprise-class hardware, suggesting that business kit is being used as a launchpad in many cases, presumably without the knowledge of corporate owners.

“Even more disturbing is the fact that among all the IP addresses from which attacks originated, there were some that hosted monitoring and/or device management systems with enterprise and security links,” researchers said.

These included point-of-sale devices in retail stores, restaurants and filling stations; digital TV broadcasting systems; physical security and access control systems; and environmental monitoring devices.

Researchers also detected malware infecting a monitoring system at a seismic station in Bangkok, as well as industry-grade programmable microcontrollers and power management systems elsewhere.

The honeypots detected attacks from China, Vietnam, Russia, Brazil and Turkey.

“The growing number of malware programs targeting IoT devices and related security incidents demonstrates how serious the problem of smart device security is. 2016 has shown that these threats are not just conceptual but are in fact very real,” the researchers said. “The existing competition in the DDoS market drives cybercriminals to look for new resources to launch increasingly powerful attacks.”

Kaspersky recommends that devices should not allow access from outside of their immediate local network, unless it is specifically needed to use a device. All network services that are not needed should also be disabled. Default passwords should be changed and, if they can’t be, then network services should be disabled where these passwords are used, or alternatively, access to devices from outside the local network should be disabled.

Read more: Entropy: a shot in the arm for IoT security?

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Internet of Business

Monitored alarm systems in Europe and North America reached 41 million at the end of 2016

Monitored alarm systems in Europe and North America reached 41 million at the end of 2016

According to a new research report by Berg Insight, the number of monitored alarm systems in Europe is forecasted to grow from 8.7 million in 2016 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.0 percent to reach 10.6 million in 2021.

In North America, the number of monitored alarm systems is forecasted to grow at a CAGR of 2.9 percent from 32.1 million at the end of 2016 to 37.1 million at the end of 2021.

Small alarm systems for businesses and private homes can be divided into two main categories – local alarms and monitored alarms. The simplest type of local alarm only reacts to activation by ringing bells to alert the surroundings and scare off intruders. A more advanced type of local alarm is a self-monitoring alarm. Monitored alarms are connected to an Alarm Receiving Centre (ARC) that can respond to an activated alarm by contacting the police or dispatching a security patrol.

ADT is the leading provider of monitored alarm systems in North America. In 2016, ADT merged with Protection 1, which makes the combined company the clear market leader. Vivint and MONI Smart Security are other players with well over a million monitored alarms. Comcast and Slomin’s are two other major actors on the very fragmented North American market. Verisure is the leading player on the European market, with monitored alarms in a dozen countries. Securitas, G4S and the rising star Sector Alarm are all sizeable players, especially in the northern part of Europe. In the southern part of Europe, Prosegur and EPS are two dominant players. United Technologies Corporation with its Climate, Controls & Security business as well as Stanley Security and Johnson Controls (acquired Tyco in 2016) are also important players active in both Europe and North America.

cellular m2m connections in security applications 2015-2021There is still a significant growth potential for monitored small alarm systems, especially in Europe where the total penetration reached only 3.7 percent of all businesses and households at the end of 2016. “The penetration of monitored alarm systems in North America is much higher than in Europe and the corresponding figure was in this region 22.0 percent at the end of 2016”, says Anders Frick, Senior Analyst at Berg Insight.

The most important factor for market growth today is active marketing and sales led by specialist alarm service companies and new market entrants from the home automation industry.

Mr Frick concluded:

“Alarm systems are becoming more valuable for customers as the scope of offerings are being expanded to include detection of fire, carbon monoxide and water leaks, as well as home automation features such as smart plugs, locks, cameras, lighting and thermostat control.”

Download report brochure: Security Applications and Wireless M2M

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